What is an Elastic integration?

This integration is powered by Elastic Agent. Elastic Agent is a single, unified way to add monitoring for logs, metrics, and other types of data to a host. It can also protect hosts from security threats, query data from operating systems, forward data from remote services or hardware, and more. Refer to our documentation for a detailed comparison between Beats and Elastic Agent.

Prefer to use Beats for this use case? See Filebeat modules for logs or Metricbeat modules for metrics.

Overview

The Windows integration allows you to monitor the Windows OS, services, applications, and more.

Use the Windows integration to collect metrics and logs from your machine. Then visualize that data in Kibana, create alerts to notify you if something goes wrong, and reference data when troubleshooting an issue.

For example, if you wanted to know if a Windows service unexpectedly stops running, you could install the Windows integration to send service metrics to Elastic. Then, you could view real-time changes to service status in Kibana's [Metrics Windows] Services dashboard.

Data streams

The Windows integration collects two types of data: logs and metrics.

Logs help you keep a record of events that happen on your machine. Log data streams collected by the Windows integration include forwarded events, PowerShell events, and Sysmon events. Log collection for the Security, Application, and System event logs is handled by the System integration. See more details in the Logs reference.

Metrics give you insight into the state of the machine. Metric data streams collected by the Windows integration include service details and performance counter values. See more details in the Metrics reference.

Note: For 7.11, security, application and system logs have been moved to the system package.

Requirements

You need Elasticsearch for storing and searching your data and Kibana for visualizing and managing it. You can use our hosted Elasticsearch Service on Elastic Cloud, which is recommended, or self-manage the Elastic Stack on your own hardware.

Each data stream collects different kinds of metric data, which may require dedicated permissions to be fetched and which may vary across operating systems.

Setup

For step-by-step instructions on how to set up an integration, see the Getting started guide.

Note: Because the Windows integration always applies to the local server, the hosts config option is not needed.

Ingesting Windows Events via Splunk

This integration allows you to seamlessly ingest data from a Splunk Enterprise instance. The integration uses the httpjson input in Elastic Agent to run a Splunk search via the Splunk REST API and then extract the raw event from the results. The raw event is then processed via the Elastic Agent. You can customize both the Splunk search query and the interval between searches. For more information see Ingest data from Splunk.

Note: This integration requires Windows Events from Splunk to be in XML format. To achieve this, renderXml needs to be set to 1 in your inputs.conf file.

Logs reference

Forwarded

The Windows forwarded data stream provides events from the Windows ForwardedEvents event log. The fields will be the same as the channel specific data streams.

Powershell

The Windows powershell data stream provides events from the Windows Windows PowerShell event log.

An example event for powershell looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2020-05-13T13:21:43.183Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "9c05a45c-02bf-4437-9447-8591244dbdca",
        "hostname": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "windows.powershell",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": "process",
        "code": "600",
        "created": "2022-03-31T08:41:12.816Z",
        "dataset": "windows.powershell",
        "ingested": "2022-03-31T08:41:16Z",
        "kind": "event",
        "original": "\u003cEvent xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event'\u003e\u003cSystem\u003e\u003cProvider Name='PowerShell'/\u003e\u003cEventID Qualifiers='0'\u003e600\u003c/EventID\u003e\u003cLevel\u003e4\u003c/Level\u003e\u003cTask\u003e6\u003c/Task\u003e\u003cKeywords\u003e0x80000000000000\u003c/Keywords\u003e\u003cTimeCreated SystemTime='2020-05-13T13:21:43.183180900Z'/\u003e\u003cEventRecordID\u003e1089\u003c/EventRecordID\u003e\u003cChannel\u003eWindows PowerShell\u003c/Channel\u003e\u003cComputer\u003evagrant\u003c/Computer\u003e\u003cSecurity/\u003e\u003c/System\u003e\u003cEventData\u003e\u003cData\u003eCertificate\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003eStarted\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003e\tProviderName=Certificate\n\tNewProviderState=Started\n\n\tSequenceNumber=35\n\n\tHostName=Windows PowerShell ISE Host\n\tHostVersion=5.1.17763.1007\n\tHostId=86edc16f-6943-469e-8bd8-ef1857080206\n\tHostApplication=C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell_ise.exe C:\\Users\\vagrant\\Desktop\\lateral.ps1\n\tEngineVersion=5.1.17763.1007\n\tRunspaceId=9d21da0b-e402-40e1-92ff-98c5ab1137a9\n\tPipelineId=15\n\tCommandName=\n\tCommandType=\n\tScriptName=\n\tCommandPath=\n\tCommandLine=\u003c/Data\u003e\u003c/EventData\u003e\u003c/Event\u003e\n\u003cEvent xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event'\u003e\u003cSystem\u003e\u003cProvider Name='PowerShell'/\u003e\u003cEventID Qualifiers='0'\u003e600\u003c/EventID\u003e\u003cLevel\u003e4\u003c/Level\u003e\u003cTask\u003e6\u003c/Task\u003e\u003cKeywords\u003e0x80000000000000\u003c/Keywords\u003e\u003cTimeCreated SystemTime='2020-05-13T13:25:04.656426900Z'/\u003e\u003cEventRecordID\u003e1266\u003c/EventRecordID\u003e\u003cChannel\u003eWindows PowerShell\u003c/Channel\u003e\u003cComputer\u003evagrant\u003c/Computer\u003e\u003cSecurity/\u003e\u003c/System\u003e\u003cEventData\u003e\u003cData\u003eRegistry\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003eStarted\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003e\tProviderName=Registry\n\tNewProviderState=Started\n\n\tSequenceNumber=1\n\n\tHostName=ConsoleHost\n\tHostVersion=5.1.17763.1007\n\tHostId=44b8d66c-f5a2-4abb-ac7d-6db73990a6d3\n\tHostApplication=C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe -noexit -command 'C:\\Gopath\\src\\github.com\\elastic\\beats'\n\tEngineVersion=\n\tRunspaceId=\n\tPipelineId=\n\tCommandName=\n\tCommandType=\n\tScriptName=\n\tCommandPath=\n\tCommandLine=\u003c/Data\u003e\u003c/EventData\u003e\u003c/Event\u003e\n\u003cEvent xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event'\u003e\u003cSystem\u003e\u003cProvider Name='PowerShell'/\u003e\u003cEventID Qualifiers='0'\u003e600\u003c/EventID\u003e\u003cLevel\u003e4\u003c/Level\u003e\u003cTask\u003e6\u003c/Task\u003e\u003cKeywords\u003e0x80000000000000\u003c/Keywords\u003e\u003cTimeCreated SystemTime='2020-06-04T07:25:04.857430200Z'/\u003e\u003cEventRecordID\u003e18640\u003c/EventRecordID\u003e\u003cChannel\u003eWindows PowerShell\u003c/Channel\u003e\u003cComputer\u003evagrant\u003c/Computer\u003e\u003cSecurity/\u003e\u003c/System\u003e\u003cEventData\u003e\u003cData\u003eCertificate\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003eStarted\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData\u003e\tProviderName=Certificate\n\tNewProviderState=Started\n\n\tSequenceNumber=8\n\n\tHostName=ConsoleHost\n\tHostVersion=2.0\n\tHostId=99a16837-7392-463d-afe5-5f3ed24bd358\n\tEngineVersion=\n\tRunspaceId=\n\tPipelineId=\n\tCommandName=\n\tCommandType=\n\tScriptName=\n\tCommandPath=\n\tCommandLine=\u003c/Data\u003e\u003c/EventData\u003e\u003c/Event\u003e",
        "provider": "PowerShell",
        "sequence": 35,
        "type": "info"
    },
    "host": {
        "name": "vagrant"
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "log": {
        "level": "information"
    },
    "powershell": {
        "engine": {
            "version": "5.1.17763.1007"
        },
        "pipeline_id": "15",
        "process": {
            "executable_version": "5.1.17763.1007"
        },
        "provider": {
            "name": "Certificate",
            "new_state": "Started"
        },
        "runspace_id": "9d21da0b-e402-40e1-92ff-98c5ab1137a9"
    },
    "process": {
        "args": [
            "C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell_ise.exe",
            "C:\\Users\\vagrant\\Desktop\\lateral.ps1"
        ],
        "args_count": 2,
        "command_line": "C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell_ise.exe C:\\Users\\vagrant\\Desktop\\lateral.ps1",
        "entity_id": "86edc16f-6943-469e-8bd8-ef1857080206",
        "title": "Windows PowerShell ISE Host"
    },
    "tags": [
        "forwarded",
        "preserve_original_event"
    ],
    "winlog": {
        "channel": "Windows PowerShell",
        "computer_name": "vagrant",
        "event_id": "600",
        "keywords": [
            "Classic"
        ],
        "provider_name": "PowerShell",
        "record_id": "1089"
    }
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
dataset.name
Dataset name.
constant_keyword
dataset.namespace
Dataset namespace.
constant_keyword
dataset.type
Dataset type.
constant_keyword
destination.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
destination.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
destination.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
destination.user.name.text
Multi-field of destination.user.name.
match_only_text
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.provider
Source of the event. Event transports such as Syslog or the Windows Event Log typically mention the source of an event. It can be the name of the software that generated the event (e.g. Sysmon, httpd), or of a subsystem of the operating system (kernel, Microsoft-Windows-Security-Auditing).
keyword
event.sequence
Sequence number of the event. The sequence number is a value published by some event sources, to make the exact ordering of events unambiguous, regardless of the timestamp precision.
long
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
file.directory
Directory where the file is located. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.extension
File extension, excluding the leading dot. Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
file.path
Full path to the file, including the file name. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.path.text
Multi-field of file.path.
match_only_text
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.level
Original log level of the log event. If the source of the event provides a log level or textual severity, this is the one that goes in log.level. If your source doesn't specify one, you may put your event transport's severity here (e.g. Syslog severity). Some examples are warn, err, i, informational.
keyword
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
powershell.command.invocation_details
An array of objects containing detailed information of the executed command.
array
powershell.command.invocation_details.name
Only used for ParameterBinding detail type. Indicates the parameter name.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.related_command
The command to which the detail is related to.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.type
The type of detail.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.value
The value of the detail. The meaning of it will depend on the detail type.
text
powershell.command.name
Name of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.path
Path of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.type
Type of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.value
The invoked command.
text
powershell.connected_user.domain
User domain.
keyword
powershell.connected_user.name
User name.
keyword
powershell.engine.new_state
New state of the PowerShell engine.
keyword
powershell.engine.previous_state
Previous state of the PowerShell engine.
keyword
powershell.engine.version
Version of the PowerShell engine version used to execute the command.
keyword
powershell.file.script_block_id
Id of the executed script block.
keyword
powershell.file.script_block_text
Text of the executed script block.
text
powershell.id
Shell Id.
keyword
powershell.pipeline_id
Pipeline id.
keyword
powershell.process.executable_version
Version of the engine hosting process executable.
keyword
powershell.provider.name
Provider name.
keyword
powershell.provider.new_state
New state of the PowerShell provider.
keyword
powershell.runspace_id
Runspace id.
keyword
powershell.sequence
Sequence number of the powershell execution.
long
powershell.total
Total number of messages in the sequence.
long
process.args
Array of process arguments, starting with the absolute path to the executable. May be filtered to protect sensitive information.
keyword
process.args_count
Length of the process.args array. This field can be useful for querying or performing bucket analysis on how many arguments were provided to start a process. More arguments may be an indication of suspicious activity.
long
process.command_line
Full command line that started the process, including the absolute path to the executable, and all arguments. Some arguments may be filtered to protect sensitive information.
wildcard
process.command_line.text
Multi-field of process.command_line.
match_only_text
process.entity_id
Unique identifier for the process. The implementation of this is specified by the data source, but some examples of what could be used here are a process-generated UUID, Sysmon Process GUIDs, or a hash of some uniquely identifying components of a process. Constructing a globally unique identifier is a common practice to mitigate PID reuse as well as to identify a specific process over time, across multiple monitored hosts.
keyword
process.executable
Absolute path to the process executable.
keyword
process.executable.text
Multi-field of process.executable.
match_only_text
process.name
Process name. Sometimes called program name or similar.
keyword
process.name.text
Multi-field of process.name.
match_only_text
process.pid
Process id.
long
process.title
Process title. The proctitle, some times the same as process name. Can also be different: for example a browser setting its title to the web page currently opened.
keyword
process.title.text
Multi-field of process.title.
match_only_text
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
source.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
source.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
source.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
source.user.name.text
Multi-field of source.user.name.
match_only_text
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text
winlog.activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the current activity. The events that are published with this identifier are part of the same activity.
keyword
winlog.api
The event log API type used to read the record. The possible values are "wineventlog" for the Windows Event Log API or "eventlogging" for the Event Logging API. The Event Logging API was designed for Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 operating systems. In Windows Vista, the event logging infrastructure was redesigned. On Windows Vista or later operating systems, the Windows Event Log API is used. Winlogbeat automatically detects which API to use for reading event logs.
keyword
winlog.channel
The name of the channel from which this record was read. This value is one of the names from the event_logs collection in the configuration.
keyword
winlog.computer_name
The name of the computer that generated the record. When using Windows event forwarding, this name can differ from agent.hostname.
keyword
winlog.event_data
The event-specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with user_data. If you are capturing event data on versions prior to Windows Vista, the parameters in event_data are named param1, param2, and so on, because event log parameters are unnamed in earlier versions of Windows.
object
winlog.event_data.AuthenticationPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Binary
keyword
winlog.event_data.BitlockerUserInputTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootMode
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootType
keyword
winlog.event_data.BuildVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Company
keyword
winlog.event_data.CorruptionActionState
keyword
winlog.event_data.CreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.Description
keyword
winlog.event_data.Detail
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMajor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMinor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriveName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DwordVal
keyword
winlog.event_data.EntryCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.ExtraInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureName
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.FileVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.FinalStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Group
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleStateCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.ImpersonationLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IntegrityLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpAddress
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpPort
keyword
winlog.event_data.KeyLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastBootGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastShutdownGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LmPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonType
keyword
winlog.event_data.MajorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.MaximumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberName
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumThrottlePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.NominalFrequency
keyword
winlog.event_data.Number
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.OriginalFileName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Path
keyword
winlog.event_data.PerformanceImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousCreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PrivilegeList
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPath
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Product
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaPolicyId
keyword
winlog.event_data.QfeVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Reason
keyword
winlog.event_data.SchemaVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ScriptBlockText
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownActionType
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownEventCode
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownReason
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signature
keyword
winlog.event_data.SignatureStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signed
keyword
winlog.event_data.StartTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.State
keyword
winlog.event_data.Status
keyword
winlog.event_data.StopTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TSId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetServerName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TerminalSessionId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TokenElevationType
keyword
winlog.event_data.TransmittedServices
keyword
winlog.event_data.UserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Version
keyword
winlog.event_data.Workstation
keyword
winlog.event_data.param1
keyword
winlog.event_data.param2
keyword
winlog.event_data.param3
keyword
winlog.event_data.param4
keyword
winlog.event_data.param5
keyword
winlog.event_data.param6
keyword
winlog.event_data.param7
keyword
winlog.event_data.param8
keyword
winlog.event_id
The event identifier. The value is specific to the source of the event.
keyword
winlog.keywords
The keywords are used to classify an event.
keyword
winlog.opcode
The opcode defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged.
keyword
winlog.process.pid
The process_id of the Client Server Runtime Process.
long
winlog.process.thread.id
long
winlog.provider_guid
A globally unique identifier that identifies the provider that logged the event.
keyword
winlog.provider_name
The source of the event log record (the application or service that logged the record).
keyword
winlog.record_id
The record ID of the event log record. The first record written to an event log is record number 1, and other records are numbered sequentially. If the record number reaches the maximum value (2^32^ for the Event Logging API and 2^64^ for the Windows Event Log API), the next record number will be 0.
keyword
winlog.related_activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the activity to which control was transferred to. The related events would then have this identifier as their activity_id identifier.
keyword
winlog.task
The task defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged. The category used by the Event Logging API (on pre Windows Vista operating systems) is written to this field.
keyword
winlog.user.domain
The domain that the account associated with this event is a member of.
keyword
winlog.user.identifier
The Windows security identifier (SID) of the account associated with this event. If Winlogbeat cannot resolve the SID to a name, then the user.name, user.domain, and user.type fields will be omitted from the event. If you discover Winlogbeat not resolving SIDs, review the log for clues as to what the problem may be.
keyword
winlog.user.name
Name of the user associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user.type
The type of account associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user_data
The event specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with event_data.
object
winlog.version
The version number of the event's definition.
long

Powershell/Operational

The Windows powershell_operational data stream provides events from the Windows Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell/Operational event log.

An example event for powershell_operational looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2020-05-13T09:04:04.755Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "d531ecae-45f4-4f96-a334-2c851a45469a",
        "hostname": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "windows.powershell_operational",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": "process",
        "code": "4105",
        "created": "2022-03-31T08:41:48.560Z",
        "dataset": "windows.powershell_operational",
        "ingested": "2022-03-31T08:41:49Z",
        "kind": "event",
        "original": "\u003cEvent xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event'\u003e\u003cSystem\u003e\u003cProvider Name='Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell' Guid='{a0c1853b-5c40-4b15-8766-3cf1c58f985a}'/\u003e\u003cEventID\u003e4105\u003c/EventID\u003e\u003cVersion\u003e1\u003c/Version\u003e\u003cLevel\u003e5\u003c/Level\u003e\u003cTask\u003e102\u003c/Task\u003e\u003cOpcode\u003e15\u003c/Opcode\u003e\u003cKeywords\u003e0x0\u003c/Keywords\u003e\u003cTimeCreated SystemTime='2020-05-13T09:04:04.755232500Z'/\u003e\u003cEventRecordID\u003e790\u003c/EventRecordID\u003e\u003cCorrelation ActivityID='{dd68516a-2930-0000-5962-68dd3029d601}'/\u003e\u003cExecution ProcessID='4204' ThreadID='1476'/\u003e\u003cChannel\u003eMicrosoft-Windows-PowerShell/Operational\u003c/Channel\u003e\u003cComputer\u003evagrant\u003c/Computer\u003e\u003cSecurity UserID='S-1-5-21-1350058589-2282154016-2764056528-1000'/\u003e\u003c/System\u003e\u003cEventData\u003e\u003cData Name='ScriptBlockId'\u003ef4a378ab-b74f-41a7-a5ef-6dd55562fdb9\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='RunspaceId'\u003e9c031e5c-8d5a-4b91-a12e-b3624970b623\u003c/Data\u003e\u003c/EventData\u003e\u003c/Event\u003e",
        "provider": "Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell",
        "type": "start"
    },
    "host": {
        "name": "vagrant"
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "log": {
        "level": "verbose"
    },
    "powershell": {
        "file": {
            "script_block_id": "f4a378ab-b74f-41a7-a5ef-6dd55562fdb9"
        },
        "runspace_id": "9c031e5c-8d5a-4b91-a12e-b3624970b623"
    },
    "tags": [
        "forwarded",
        "preserve_original_event"
    ],
    "user": {
        "id": "S-1-5-21-1350058589-2282154016-2764056528-1000"
    },
    "winlog": {
        "activity_id": "{dd68516a-2930-0000-5962-68dd3029d601}",
        "channel": "Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell/Operational",
        "computer_name": "vagrant",
        "event_id": "4105",
        "process": {
            "pid": 4204,
            "thread": {
                "id": 1476
            }
        },
        "provider_guid": "{a0c1853b-5c40-4b15-8766-3cf1c58f985a}",
        "provider_name": "Microsoft-Windows-PowerShell",
        "record_id": "790",
        "user": {
            "identifier": "S-1-5-21-1350058589-2282154016-2764056528-1000"
        },
        "version": 1
    }
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
dataset.name
Dataset name.
constant_keyword
dataset.namespace
Dataset namespace.
constant_keyword
dataset.type
Dataset type.
constant_keyword
destination.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
destination.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
destination.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
destination.user.name.text
Multi-field of destination.user.name.
match_only_text
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.provider
Source of the event. Event transports such as Syslog or the Windows Event Log typically mention the source of an event. It can be the name of the software that generated the event (e.g. Sysmon, httpd), or of a subsystem of the operating system (kernel, Microsoft-Windows-Security-Auditing).
keyword
event.sequence
Sequence number of the event. The sequence number is a value published by some event sources, to make the exact ordering of events unambiguous, regardless of the timestamp precision.
long
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
file.directory
Directory where the file is located. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.extension
File extension, excluding the leading dot. Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
file.path
Full path to the file, including the file name. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.path.text
Multi-field of file.path.
match_only_text
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.level
Original log level of the log event. If the source of the event provides a log level or textual severity, this is the one that goes in log.level. If your source doesn't specify one, you may put your event transport's severity here (e.g. Syslog severity). Some examples are warn, err, i, informational.
keyword
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
powershell.command.invocation_details
An array of objects containing detailed information of the executed command.
array
powershell.command.invocation_details.name
Only used for ParameterBinding detail type. Indicates the parameter name.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.related_command
The command to which the detail is related to.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.type
The type of detail.
keyword
powershell.command.invocation_details.value
The value of the detail. The meaning of it will depend on the detail type.
text
powershell.command.name
Name of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.path
Path of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.type
Type of the executed command.
keyword
powershell.command.value
The invoked command.
text
powershell.connected_user.domain
User domain.
keyword
powershell.connected_user.name
User name.
keyword
powershell.engine.new_state
New state of the PowerShell engine.
keyword
powershell.engine.previous_state
Previous state of the PowerShell engine.
keyword
powershell.engine.version
Version of the PowerShell engine version used to execute the command.
keyword
powershell.file.script_block_id
Id of the executed script block.
keyword
powershell.file.script_block_text
Text of the executed script block.
text
powershell.id
Shell Id.
keyword
powershell.pipeline_id
Pipeline id.
keyword
powershell.process.executable_version
Version of the engine hosting process executable.
keyword
powershell.provider.name
Provider name.
keyword
powershell.provider.new_state
New state of the PowerShell provider.
keyword
powershell.runspace_id
Runspace id.
keyword
powershell.sequence
Sequence number of the powershell execution.
long
powershell.total
Total number of messages in the sequence.
long
process.args
Array of process arguments, starting with the absolute path to the executable. May be filtered to protect sensitive information.
keyword
process.args_count
Length of the process.args array. This field can be useful for querying or performing bucket analysis on how many arguments were provided to start a process. More arguments may be an indication of suspicious activity.
long
process.command_line
Full command line that started the process, including the absolute path to the executable, and all arguments. Some arguments may be filtered to protect sensitive information.
wildcard
process.command_line.text
Multi-field of process.command_line.
match_only_text
process.entity_id
Unique identifier for the process. The implementation of this is specified by the data source, but some examples of what could be used here are a process-generated UUID, Sysmon Process GUIDs, or a hash of some uniquely identifying components of a process. Constructing a globally unique identifier is a common practice to mitigate PID reuse as well as to identify a specific process over time, across multiple monitored hosts.
keyword
process.executable
Absolute path to the process executable.
keyword
process.executable.text
Multi-field of process.executable.
match_only_text
process.name
Process name. Sometimes called program name or similar.
keyword
process.name.text
Multi-field of process.name.
match_only_text
process.pid
Process id.
long
process.title
Process title. The proctitle, some times the same as process name. Can also be different: for example a browser setting its title to the web page currently opened.
keyword
process.title.text
Multi-field of process.title.
match_only_text
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
source.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
source.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
source.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
source.user.name.text
Multi-field of source.user.name.
match_only_text
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text
winlog.activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the current activity. The events that are published with this identifier are part of the same activity.
keyword
winlog.api
The event log API type used to read the record. The possible values are "wineventlog" for the Windows Event Log API or "eventlogging" for the Event Logging API. The Event Logging API was designed for Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 operating systems. In Windows Vista, the event logging infrastructure was redesigned. On Windows Vista or later operating systems, the Windows Event Log API is used. Winlogbeat automatically detects which API to use for reading event logs.
keyword
winlog.channel
The name of the channel from which this record was read. This value is one of the names from the event_logs collection in the configuration.
keyword
winlog.computer_name
The name of the computer that generated the record. When using Windows event forwarding, this name can differ from agent.hostname.
keyword
winlog.event_data
The event-specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with user_data. If you are capturing event data on versions prior to Windows Vista, the parameters in event_data are named param1, param2, and so on, because event log parameters are unnamed in earlier versions of Windows.
object
winlog.event_data.AuthenticationPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Binary
keyword
winlog.event_data.BitlockerUserInputTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootMode
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootType
keyword
winlog.event_data.BuildVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Company
keyword
winlog.event_data.CorruptionActionState
keyword
winlog.event_data.CreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.Description
keyword
winlog.event_data.Detail
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMajor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMinor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriveName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DwordVal
keyword
winlog.event_data.EntryCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.ExtraInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureName
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.FileVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.FinalStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Group
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleStateCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.ImpersonationLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IntegrityLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpAddress
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpPort
keyword
winlog.event_data.KeyLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastBootGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastShutdownGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LmPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonType
keyword
winlog.event_data.MajorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.MaximumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberName
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumThrottlePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.NominalFrequency
keyword
winlog.event_data.Number
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.OriginalFileName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Path
keyword
winlog.event_data.PerformanceImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousCreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PrivilegeList
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPath
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Product
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaPolicyId
keyword
winlog.event_data.QfeVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Reason
keyword
winlog.event_data.SchemaVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ScriptBlockText
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownActionType
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownEventCode
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownReason
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signature
keyword
winlog.event_data.SignatureStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signed
keyword
winlog.event_data.StartTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.State
keyword
winlog.event_data.Status
keyword
winlog.event_data.StopTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TSId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetServerName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TerminalSessionId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TokenElevationType
keyword
winlog.event_data.TransmittedServices
keyword
winlog.event_data.UserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Version
keyword
winlog.event_data.Workstation
keyword
winlog.event_data.param1
keyword
winlog.event_data.param2
keyword
winlog.event_data.param3
keyword
winlog.event_data.param4
keyword
winlog.event_data.param5
keyword
winlog.event_data.param6
keyword
winlog.event_data.param7
keyword
winlog.event_data.param8
keyword
winlog.event_id
The event identifier. The value is specific to the source of the event.
keyword
winlog.keywords
The keywords are used to classify an event.
keyword
winlog.opcode
The opcode defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged.
keyword
winlog.process.pid
The process_id of the Client Server Runtime Process.
long
winlog.process.thread.id
long
winlog.provider_guid
A globally unique identifier that identifies the provider that logged the event.
keyword
winlog.provider_name
The source of the event log record (the application or service that logged the record).
keyword
winlog.record_id
The record ID of the event log record. The first record written to an event log is record number 1, and other records are numbered sequentially. If the record number reaches the maximum value (2^32^ for the Event Logging API and 2^64^ for the Windows Event Log API), the next record number will be 0.
keyword
winlog.related_activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the activity to which control was transferred to. The related events would then have this identifier as their activity_id identifier.
keyword
winlog.task
The task defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged. The category used by the Event Logging API (on pre Windows Vista operating systems) is written to this field.
keyword
winlog.user.domain
The domain that the account associated with this event is a member of.
keyword
winlog.user.identifier
The Windows security identifier (SID) of the account associated with this event. If Winlogbeat cannot resolve the SID to a name, then the user.name, user.domain, and user.type fields will be omitted from the event. If you discover Winlogbeat not resolving SIDs, review the log for clues as to what the problem may be.
keyword
winlog.user.name
Name of the user associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user.type
The type of account associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user_data
The event specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with event_data.
object
winlog.version
The version number of the event's definition.
long

Sysmon/Operational

The Windows sysmon_operational data stream provides events from the Windows Microsoft-Windows-Sysmon/Operational event log.

An example event for sysmon_operational looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2019-07-18T03:34:01.261Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "0670a96e-1852-42bc-b667-66e022ab1c89",
        "hostname": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "windows.sysmon_operational",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "dns": {
        "answers": [
            {
                "data": "www-msn-com.a-0003.a-msedge.net",
                "type": "CNAME"
            },
            {
                "data": "a-0003.a-msedge.net",
                "type": "CNAME"
            },
            {
                "data": "204.79.197.203",
                "type": "A"
            }
        ],
        "question": {
            "name": "www.msn.com",
            "registered_domain": "msn.com",
            "subdomain": "www",
            "top_level_domain": "com"
        },
        "resolved_ip": [
            "204.79.197.203"
        ]
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "0d57cbc7-6410-455a-840c-08fd44507a26",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "7.17.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": [
            "network"
        ],
        "code": "22",
        "created": "2019-07-18T03:34:02.025Z",
        "dataset": "windows.sysmon_operational",
        "ingested": "2022-03-31T08:42:26Z",
        "kind": "event",
        "original": "\u003cEvent xmlns='http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event'\u003e\u003cSystem\u003e\u003cProvider Name='Microsoft-Windows-Sysmon' Guid='{5770385f-c22a-43e0-bf4c-06f5698ffbd9}'/\u003e\u003cEventID\u003e22\u003c/EventID\u003e\u003cVersion\u003e5\u003c/Version\u003e\u003cLevel\u003e4\u003c/Level\u003e\u003cTask\u003e22\u003c/Task\u003e\u003cOpcode\u003e0\u003c/Opcode\u003e\u003cKeywords\u003e0x8000000000000000\u003c/Keywords\u003e\u003cTimeCreated SystemTime='2019-07-18T03:34:02.025237700Z'/\u003e\u003cEventRecordID\u003e67\u003c/EventRecordID\u003e\u003cCorrelation/\u003e\u003cExecution ProcessID='2828' ThreadID='1684'/\u003e\u003cChannel\u003eMicrosoft-Windows-Sysmon/Operational\u003c/Channel\u003e\u003cComputer\u003evagrant-2016\u003c/Computer\u003e\u003cSecurity UserID='S-1-5-18'/\u003e\u003c/System\u003e\u003cEventData\u003e\u003cData Name='RuleName'\u003e\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='UtcTime'\u003e2019-07-18 03:34:01.261\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='ProcessGuid'\u003e{fa4a0de6-e8a9-5d2f-0000-001053699900}\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='ProcessId'\u003e2736\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='QueryName'\u003ewww.msn.com\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='QueryStatus'\u003e0\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='QueryResults'\u003etype:  5 www-msn-com.a-0003.a-msedge.net;type:  5 a-0003.a-msedge.net;::ffff:204.79.197.203;\u003c/Data\u003e\u003cData Name='Image'\u003eC:\\Program Files (x86)\\Internet Explorer\\iexplore.exe\u003c/Data\u003e\u003c/EventData\u003e\u003c/Event\u003e",
        "provider": "Microsoft-Windows-Sysmon",
        "type": [
            "connection",
            "protocol",
            "info"
        ]
    },
    "host": {
        "name": "vagrant-2016"
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "log": {
        "level": "information"
    },
    "network": {
        "protocol": "dns"
    },
    "process": {
        "entity_id": "{fa4a0de6-e8a9-5d2f-0000-001053699900}",
        "executable": "C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Internet Explorer\\iexplore.exe",
        "name": "iexplore.exe",
        "pid": 2736
    },
    "related": {
        "hosts": [
            "www-msn-com.a-0003.a-msedge.net",
            "a-0003.a-msedge.net",
            "www.msn.com"
        ],
        "ip": [
            "204.79.197.203"
        ]
    },
    "sysmon": {
        "dns": {
            "status": "SUCCESS"
        }
    },
    "tags": [
        "forwarded",
        "preserve_original_event"
    ],
    "user": {
        "id": "S-1-5-18"
    },
    "winlog": {
        "channel": "Microsoft-Windows-Sysmon/Operational",
        "computer_name": "vagrant-2016",
        "event_id": "22",
        "opcode": "Info",
        "process": {
            "pid": 2828,
            "thread": {
                "id": 1684
            }
        },
        "provider_guid": "{5770385f-c22a-43e0-bf4c-06f5698ffbd9}",
        "provider_name": "Microsoft-Windows-Sysmon",
        "record_id": "67",
        "user": {
            "identifier": "S-1-5-18"
        },
        "version": 5
    }
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
dataset.name
Dataset name.
constant_keyword
dataset.namespace
Dataset namespace.
constant_keyword
dataset.type
Dataset type.
constant_keyword
destination.domain
The domain name of the destination system. This value may be a host name, a fully qualified domain name, or another host naming format. The value may derive from the original event or be added from enrichment.
keyword
destination.ip
IP address of the destination (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
destination.port
Port of the destination.
long
dns.answers
An array containing an object for each answer section returned by the server. The main keys that should be present in these objects are defined by ECS. Records that have more information may contain more keys than what ECS defines. Not all DNS data sources give all details about DNS answers. At minimum, answer objects must contain the data key. If more information is available, map as much of it to ECS as possible, and add any additional fields to the answer objects as custom fields.
object
dns.answers.class
The class of DNS data contained in this resource record.
keyword
dns.answers.data
The data describing the resource. The meaning of this data depends on the type and class of the resource record.
keyword
dns.answers.name
The domain name to which this resource record pertains. If a chain of CNAME is being resolved, each answer's name should be the one that corresponds with the answer's data. It should not simply be the original question.name repeated.
keyword
dns.answers.ttl
The time interval in seconds that this resource record may be cached before it should be discarded. Zero values mean that the data should not be cached.
long
dns.answers.type
The type of data contained in this resource record.
keyword
dns.header_flags
Array of 2 letter DNS header flags. Expected values are: AA, TC, RD, RA, AD, CD, DO.
keyword
dns.id
The DNS packet identifier assigned by the program that generated the query. The identifier is copied to the response.
keyword
dns.op_code
The DNS operation code that specifies the kind of query in the message. This value is set by the originator of a query and copied into the response.
keyword
dns.question.class
The class of records being queried.
keyword
dns.question.name
The name being queried. If the name field contains non-printable characters (below 32 or above 126), those characters should be represented as escaped base 10 integers (\DDD). Back slashes and quotes should be escaped. Tabs, carriage returns, and line feeds should be converted to \t, \r, and \n respectively.
keyword
dns.question.registered_domain
The highest registered domain, stripped of the subdomain. For example, the registered domain for "foo.example.com" is "example.com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last two labels will not work well for TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
dns.question.subdomain
The subdomain is all of the labels under the registered_domain. If the domain has multiple levels of subdomain, such as "sub2.sub1.example.com", the subdomain field should contain "sub2.sub1", with no trailing period.
keyword
dns.question.top_level_domain
The effective top level domain (eTLD), also known as the domain suffix, is the last part of the domain name. For example, the top level domain for example.com is "com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last label will not work well for effective TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
dns.question.type
The type of record being queried.
keyword
dns.resolved_ip
Array containing all IPs seen in answers.data. The answers array can be difficult to use, because of the variety of data formats it can contain. Extracting all IP addresses seen in there to dns.resolved_ip makes it possible to index them as IP addresses, and makes them easier to visualize and query for.
ip
dns.response_code
The DNS response code.
keyword
dns.type
The type of DNS event captured, query or answer. If your source of DNS events only gives you DNS queries, you should only create dns events of type dns.type:query. If your source of DNS events gives you answers as well, you should create one event per query (optionally as soon as the query is seen). And a second event containing all query details as well as an array of answers.
keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.code
Error code describing the error.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.provider
Source of the event. Event transports such as Syslog or the Windows Event Log typically mention the source of an event. It can be the name of the software that generated the event (e.g. Sysmon, httpd), or of a subsystem of the operating system (kernel, Microsoft-Windows-Security-Auditing).
keyword
event.sequence
Sequence number of the event. The sequence number is a value published by some event sources, to make the exact ordering of events unambiguous, regardless of the timestamp precision.
long
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
file.code_signature.exists
Boolean to capture if a signature is present.
boolean
file.code_signature.status
Additional information about the certificate status. This is useful for logging cryptographic errors with the certificate validity or trust status. Leave unpopulated if the validity or trust of the certificate was unchecked.
keyword
file.code_signature.subject_name
Subject name of the code signer
keyword
file.code_signature.trusted
Stores the trust status of the certificate chain. Validating the trust of the certificate chain may be complicated, and this field should only be populated by tools that actively check the status.
boolean
file.code_signature.valid
Boolean to capture if the digital signature is verified against the binary content. Leave unpopulated if a certificate was unchecked.
boolean
file.directory
Directory where the file is located. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.extension
File extension, excluding the leading dot. Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
file.hash.sha512
SHA512 hash.
keyword
file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
file.path
Full path to the file, including the file name. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.path.text
Multi-field of file.path.
match_only_text
file.pe.architecture
CPU architecture target for the file.
keyword
file.pe.company
Internal company name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
file.pe.description
Internal description of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
file.pe.file_version
Internal version of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
file.pe.original_file_name
Internal name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
file.pe.product
Internal product name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
group.domain
Name of the directory the group is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
group.id
Unique identifier for the group on the system/platform.
keyword
group.name
Name of the group.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.level
Original log level of the log event. If the source of the event provides a log level or textual severity, this is the one that goes in log.level. If your source doesn't specify one, you may put your event transport's severity here (e.g. Syslog severity). Some examples are warn, err, i, informational.
keyword
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
network.community_id
A hash of source and destination IPs and ports, as well as the protocol used in a communication. This is a tool-agnostic standard to identify flows. Learn more at https://github.com/corelight/community-id-spec.
keyword
network.direction
Direction of the network traffic. Recommended values are: * ingress * egress * inbound * outbound * internal * external * unknown When mapping events from a host-based monitoring context, populate this field from the host's point of view, using the values "ingress" or "egress". When mapping events from a network or perimeter-based monitoring context, populate this field from the point of view of the network perimeter, using the values "inbound", "outbound", "internal" or "external". Note that "internal" is not crossing perimeter boundaries, and is meant to describe communication between two hosts within the perimeter. Note also that "external" is meant to describe traffic between two hosts that are external to the perimeter. This could for example be useful for ISPs or VPN service providers.
keyword
network.protocol
In the OSI Model this would be the Application Layer protocol. For example, http, dns, or ssh. The field value must be normalized to lowercase for querying.
keyword
network.transport
Same as network.iana_number, but instead using the Keyword name of the transport layer (udp, tcp, ipv6-icmp, etc.) The field value must be normalized to lowercase for querying.
keyword
network.type
In the OSI Model this would be the Network Layer. ipv4, ipv6, ipsec, pim, etc The field value must be normalized to lowercase for querying.
keyword
process.args
Array of process arguments, starting with the absolute path to the executable. May be filtered to protect sensitive information.
keyword
process.args_count
Length of the process.args array. This field can be useful for querying or performing bucket analysis on how many arguments were provided to start a process. More arguments may be an indication of suspicious activity.
long
process.command_line
Full command line that started the process, including the absolute path to the executable, and all arguments. Some arguments may be filtered to protect sensitive information.
wildcard
process.command_line.text
Multi-field of process.command_line.
match_only_text
process.entity_id
Unique identifier for the process. The implementation of this is specified by the data source, but some examples of what could be used here are a process-generated UUID, Sysmon Process GUIDs, or a hash of some uniquely identifying components of a process. Constructing a globally unique identifier is a common practice to mitigate PID reuse as well as to identify a specific process over time, across multiple monitored hosts.
keyword
process.executable
Absolute path to the process executable.
keyword
process.executable.text
Multi-field of process.executable.
match_only_text
process.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
process.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
process.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
process.hash.sha512
SHA512 hash.
keyword
process.name
Process name. Sometimes called program name or similar.
keyword
process.name.text
Multi-field of process.name.
match_only_text
process.parent.args
Array of process arguments, starting with the absolute path to the executable. May be filtered to protect sensitive information.
keyword
process.parent.args_count
Length of the process.args array. This field can be useful for querying or performing bucket analysis on how many arguments were provided to start a process. More arguments may be an indication of suspicious activity.
long
process.parent.command_line
Full command line that started the process, including the absolute path to the executable, and all arguments. Some arguments may be filtered to protect sensitive information.
wildcard
process.parent.command_line.text
Multi-field of process.parent.command_line.
match_only_text
process.parent.entity_id
Unique identifier for the process. The implementation of this is specified by the data source, but some examples of what could be used here are a process-generated UUID, Sysmon Process GUIDs, or a hash of some uniquely identifying components of a process. Constructing a globally unique identifier is a common practice to mitigate PID reuse as well as to identify a specific process over time, across multiple monitored hosts.
keyword
process.parent.executable
Absolute path to the process executable.
keyword
process.parent.executable.text
Multi-field of process.parent.executable.
match_only_text
process.parent.name
Process name. Sometimes called program name or similar.
keyword
process.parent.name.text
Multi-field of process.parent.name.
match_only_text
process.parent.pid
Process id.
long
process.pe.architecture
CPU architecture target for the file.
keyword
process.pe.company
Internal company name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
process.pe.description
Internal description of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
process.pe.file_version
Internal version of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
process.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
process.pe.original_file_name
Internal name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
process.pe.product
Internal product name of the file, provided at compile-time.
keyword
process.pid
Process id.
long
process.title
Process title. The proctitle, some times the same as process name. Can also be different: for example a browser setting its title to the web page currently opened.
keyword
process.title.text
Multi-field of process.title.
match_only_text
process.working_directory
The working directory of the process.
keyword
process.working_directory.text
Multi-field of process.working_directory.
match_only_text
registry.data.strings
Content when writing string types. Populated as an array when writing string data to the registry. For single string registry types (REG_SZ, REG_EXPAND_SZ), this should be an array with one string. For sequences of string with REG_MULTI_SZ, this array will be variable length. For numeric data, such as REG_DWORD and REG_QWORD, this should be populated with the decimal representation (e.g "1").
wildcard
registry.data.type
Standard registry type for encoding contents
keyword
registry.hive
Abbreviated name for the hive.
keyword
registry.key
Hive-relative path of keys.
keyword
registry.path
Full path, including hive, key and value
keyword
registry.value
Name of the value written.
keyword
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
rule.name
The name of the rule or signature generating the event.
keyword
service.name
Name of the service data is collected from. The name of the service is normally user given. This allows for distributed services that run on multiple hosts to correlate the related instances based on the name. In the case of Elasticsearch the service.name could contain the cluster name. For Beats the service.name is by default a copy of the service.type field if no name is specified.
keyword
service.type
The type of the service data is collected from. The type can be used to group and correlate logs and metrics from one service type. Example: If logs or metrics are collected from Elasticsearch, service.type would be elasticsearch.
keyword
source.domain
The domain name of the source system. This value may be a host name, a fully qualified domain name, or another host naming format. The value may derive from the original event or be added from enrichment.
keyword
source.ip
IP address of the source (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
source.port
Port of the source.
long
sysmon.dns.status
Windows status code returned for the DNS query.
keyword
sysmon.file.archived
Indicates if the deleted file was archived.
boolean
sysmon.file.is_executable
Indicates if the deleted file was an executable.
boolean
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text
user.target.group.domain
Name of the directory the group is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.target.group.id
Unique identifier for the group on the system/platform.
keyword
user.target.group.name
Name of the group.
keyword
user.target.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.target.name.text
Multi-field of user.target.name.
match_only_text
winlog.activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the current activity. The events that are published with this identifier are part of the same activity.
keyword
winlog.api
The event log API type used to read the record. The possible values are "wineventlog" for the Windows Event Log API or "eventlogging" for the Event Logging API. The Event Logging API was designed for Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 operating systems. In Windows Vista, the event logging infrastructure was redesigned. On Windows Vista or later operating systems, the Windows Event Log API is used. Winlogbeat automatically detects which API to use for reading event logs.
keyword
winlog.channel
The name of the channel from which this record was read. This value is one of the names from the event_logs collection in the configuration.
keyword
winlog.computer_name
The name of the computer that generated the record. When using Windows event forwarding, this name can differ from agent.hostname.
keyword
winlog.event_data
The event-specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with user_data. If you are capturing event data on versions prior to Windows Vista, the parameters in event_data are named param1, param2, and so on, because event log parameters are unnamed in earlier versions of Windows.
object
winlog.event_data.AuthenticationPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Binary
keyword
winlog.event_data.BitlockerUserInputTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootMode
keyword
winlog.event_data.BootType
keyword
winlog.event_data.BuildVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ClientInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.Company
keyword
winlog.event_data.Configuration
keyword
winlog.event_data.CorruptionActionState
keyword
winlog.event_data.CreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.Description
keyword
winlog.event_data.Detail
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMajor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DeviceVersionMinor
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriveName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverName
keyword
winlog.event_data.DriverNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.DwordVal
keyword
winlog.event_data.EntryCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.EventType
keyword
winlog.event_data.ExtraInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureName
keyword
winlog.event_data.FailureNameLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.FileVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.FinalStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Group
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.IdleStateCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.ImpersonationLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IntegrityLevel
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpAddress
keyword
winlog.event_data.IpPort
keyword
winlog.event_data.KeyLength
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastBootGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LastShutdownGood
keyword
winlog.event_data.LmPackageName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.LogonType
keyword
winlog.event_data.MajorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.MaximumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberName
keyword
winlog.event_data.MemberSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumPerformancePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinimumThrottlePercent
keyword
winlog.event_data.MinorVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.NewTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.NominalFrequency
keyword
winlog.event_data.Number
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldSchemeGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.OldTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.OriginalFileName
keyword
winlog.event_data.Path
keyword
winlog.event_data.PerformanceImplementation
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousCreationUtcTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PreviousTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.PrivilegeList
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessId
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPath
keyword
winlog.event_data.ProcessPid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Product
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaCount
keyword
winlog.event_data.PuaPolicyId
keyword
winlog.event_data.QfeVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Reason
keyword
winlog.event_data.SchemaVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.ScriptBlockText
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceName
keyword
winlog.event_data.ServiceVersion
keyword
winlog.event_data.Session
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownActionType
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownEventCode
keyword
winlog.event_data.ShutdownReason
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signature
keyword
winlog.event_data.SignatureStatus
keyword
winlog.event_data.Signed
keyword
winlog.event_data.StartTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.State
keyword
winlog.event_data.Status
keyword
winlog.event_data.StopTime
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.SubjectUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TSId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetDomainName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetInfo
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonGuid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetLogonId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetServerName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserName
keyword
winlog.event_data.TargetUserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.TerminalSessionId
keyword
winlog.event_data.TokenElevationType
keyword
winlog.event_data.TransmittedServices
keyword
winlog.event_data.Type
keyword
winlog.event_data.UserSid
keyword
winlog.event_data.Version
keyword
winlog.event_data.Workstation
keyword
winlog.event_data.param1
keyword
winlog.event_data.param2
keyword
winlog.event_data.param3
keyword
winlog.event_data.param4
keyword
winlog.event_data.param5
keyword
winlog.event_data.param6
keyword
winlog.event_data.param7
keyword
winlog.event_data.param8
keyword
winlog.event_id
The event identifier. The value is specific to the source of the event.
keyword
winlog.keywords
The keywords are used to classify an event.
keyword
winlog.opcode
The opcode defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged.
keyword
winlog.process.pid
The process_id of the Client Server Runtime Process.
long
winlog.process.thread.id
long
winlog.provider_guid
A globally unique identifier that identifies the provider that logged the event.
keyword
winlog.provider_name
The source of the event log record (the application or service that logged the record).
keyword
winlog.record_id
The record ID of the event log record. The first record written to an event log is record number 1, and other records are numbered sequentially. If the record number reaches the maximum value (2^32^ for the Event Logging API and 2^64^ for the Windows Event Log API), the next record number will be 0.
keyword
winlog.related_activity_id
A globally unique identifier that identifies the activity to which control was transferred to. The related events would then have this identifier as their activity_id identifier.
keyword
winlog.task
The task defined in the event. Task and opcode are typically used to identify the location in the application from where the event was logged. The category used by the Event Logging API (on pre Windows Vista operating systems) is written to this field.
keyword
winlog.user.domain
The domain that the account associated with this event is a member of.
keyword
winlog.user.identifier
The Windows security identifier (SID) of the account associated with this event. If Winlogbeat cannot resolve the SID to a name, then the user.name, user.domain, and user.type fields will be omitted from the event. If you discover Winlogbeat not resolving SIDs, review the log for clues as to what the problem may be.
keyword
winlog.user.name
Name of the user associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user.type
The type of account associated with this event.
keyword
winlog.user_data
The event specific data. This field is mutually exclusive with event_data.
object
winlog.version
The version number of the event's definition.
long

Metrics reference

Both data streams are available on Windows only.

Service

The Windows service data stream provides service details.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
windows.service.display_name
The display name of the service.
keyword
windows.service.exit_code
For Stopped services this is the error code that service reports when starting to stopping. This will be the generic Windows service error code unless the service provides a service-specific error code.
keyword
windows.service.id
A unique ID for the service. It is a hash of the machine's GUID and the service name.
keyword
windows.service.name
The service name.
keyword
windows.service.path_name
Fully qualified path to the file that implements the service, including arguments.
keyword
windows.service.pid
For Running services this is the associated process PID.
long
windows.service.start_name
Account name under which a service runs.
keyword
windows.service.start_type
The startup type of the service. The possible values are Automatic, Boot, Disabled, Manual, and System.
keyword
windows.service.state
The actual state of the service. The possible values are Continuing, Pausing, Paused, Running, Starting, Stopping, and Stopped.
keyword
windows.service.uptime.ms
The service's uptime specified in milliseconds.
long

Perfmon

The Windows perfmon data stream provides performance counter values.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
windows.perfmon.instance
Instance value.
keyword
windows.perfmon.metrics.*.*
Metric values returned.
object
windows.perfmon.object
Object value.
keyword

Changelog

VersionDetails
1.15.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add support for events 4674, 4738 and 4742.
1.14.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix translate_sid processor error in powershell operational data stream.
1.14.0
Enhancement View pull request
Use MemberSid to enrich for user name and domain where possible.
1.13.0
Enhancement View pull request
Added Processors for service datatstream.
1.12.4
Enhancement View pull request
Update documentation with additional context for new users.
1.12.3
Enhancement View pull request
update readme added link to Microsoft documentation and reworded a link
1.12.2
Bug fix View pull request
Fix processing of Powershell event 800 parameter details.
1.12.1
Bug fix View pull request
Drop unset fields in sysmon_operational data stream.
1.12.0
Enhancement View pull request
Support for Sysmon Registry non-QWORD/DWORD events
1.11.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add parent process ID to security event for new process creation.
1.10.1
Enhancement View pull request
Add documentation for multi-fields
1.10.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add sysmon event 26 handling

Enhancement View pull request
Normalise field order and remove event.ingested
1.9.0
Enhancement View pull request
Expose winlog input ignore_older option.

Bug fix View pull request
Fix preserve original event option

Enhancement View pull request
Make order of options consistent with other winlog based integrations.
1.8.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.0
1.7.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add provider name check to forwarded/security conditional.
1.6.0
Enhancement View pull request
Expose winlog input language option.
1.5.1
Bug fix View pull request
Change test public IPs to the supported subset
1.5.0
Enhancement View pull request
Support Kibana 8.0
1.4.0
Enhancement View pull request
Don't split hyphenated tokens for PowerShell scripts
1.3.3
Enhancement View pull request
Uniform with guidelines
1.3.2
Bug fix View pull request
Fix processors configuration
1.3.1
Enhancement View pull request
Update Splunk input description
1.3.0
Bug fix View pull request
Consistently map message field in Windows integrations.
1.2.3
Bug fix View pull request
Fix ingest pipeline templating for related.ip
1.2.2
Bug fix View pull request
Prevent pipeline script error
1.2.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix logic that checks for the 'forwarded' tag
1.2.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 1.12.0
1.1.3
Enhancement View pull request
Convert to generated ECS fields
1.1.2
Enhancement View pull request
update to ECS 1.11.0
1.1.1
Enhancement View pull request
Escape special characters in docs
1.1.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update integration description
1.0.0
Enhancement View pull request
make GA

Enhancement View pull request
Set "event.module" and "event.dataset"
0.9.2
Enhancement View pull request
Add support for Splunk authorization tokens
0.9.1
Enhancement View pull request
Use new wildcard type.
0.9.0
Enhancement View pull request
Make event.original optional and upgrade to ECS 1.10.0.
0.8.2
Enhancement View pull request
Add system tests for Splunk http inputs and improve README.

Bug fix View pull request
Fix sysmon pipeline when processing dns.resolved_ip.
0.8.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix security pipeline to support string event.code.
0.8.0
Enhancement View pull request
Use ingest pipelines for forwarded dataset.
0.7.0
Enhancement View pull request
Move Sysmon edge processing to ingest pipeline.
0.6.0
Enhancement View pull request
Move PowerShell edge processing to ingest pipeline.
0.5.2
Enhancement View pull request
Change Splunk input to use the decode_xml_wineventlog processor.
0.5.1
Enhancement View pull request
Add support for Sysmon v13 events.
0.5.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add Splunk input for Winlog data streams.
0.4.3
Enhancement View pull request
Updating package owner

Enhancement View pull request
update to ECS 1.9.0
0.4.2
Bug fix View pull request
Move security data stream
0.4.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix Guards
0.1.0
Enhancement View pull request
initial release