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Tines

Tines Logs & Time Saved Reports

Version
1.9.1 (View all)
Compatible Kibana version(s)
8.7.1 or higher
Supported Serverless project types

Security
Observability
Subscription level
Basic
Level of support
Community

Tines makes data, including logs, related to use and configuration of a Tines tenant available via a REST API.

This integration can be used to collect:

  1. audit logs
  2. time saved reports

The Tines API documentation is available via this page.

Compatibility

The package collects "audit log" events and "time saved" reports from the Tines API.

At present the only API version available, and hence the version assumed to be polled by this integration, is v1.

The audit logs list endpoint is documented here.

The time saved reporting endpoint is documented here.

Configuration

Find your Tines tenant URL

This is available within the Tines web interface via the URL bar, e.g. https://your-tenant-1234.tines.com

NOTE: the trailing domain may be tines.io for your particular tenant.

Create a Tines user API key

Refer to this documentation from Tines regarding how to create an API key.

The API key can be either a Personal or Tenant API key.

Enabling the integration in Elastic

  1. In Kibana go to Management > Integrations
  2. In "Search for integrations" search bar type Tines
  3. Click on "Tines" integration from the search results.
  4. Click on Add Tines button to add the Tines integration.
  5. Modify the Tines Tenant URL as appropriate
  6. Insert your Tines API user email address
  7. Insert the Tines API key created associated with the API user email address

Dashboards

There are two dashboards immediately available as part of the integration.

The Tines Audit Logs summary dashboard,

And the Tines Time Saved dashboard,

Data Stream

audit_logs

All fields ingested to this data stream are stored under tines.audit_log as each audit_log event is stored individually.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Date/time when the event originated. This is the date/time extracted from the event, typically representing when the event was generated by the source. If the event source has no original timestamp, this value is typically populated by the first time the event was received by the pipeline. Required field for all events.
date
data_stream.dataset
The field can contain anything that makes sense to signify the source of the data. Examples include nginx.access, prometheus, endpoint etc. For data streams that otherwise fit, but that do not have dataset set we use the value "generic" for the dataset value. event.dataset should have the same value as data_stream.dataset. Beyond the Elasticsearch data stream naming criteria noted above, the dataset value has additional restrictions: * Must not contain - * No longer than 100 characters
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
A user defined namespace. Namespaces are useful to allow grouping of data. Many users already organize their indices this way, and the data stream naming scheme now provides this best practice as a default. Many users will populate this field with default. If no value is used, it falls back to default. Beyond the Elasticsearch index naming criteria noted above, namespace value has the additional restrictions: * Must not contain - * No longer than 100 characters
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
An overarching type for the data stream. Currently allowed values are "logs" and "metrics". We expect to also add "traces" and "synthetics" in the near future.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.id
Unique ID to describe the event.
keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data is coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.provider
Source of the event. Event transports such as Syslog or the Windows Event Log typically mention the source of an event. It can be the name of the software that generated the event (e.g. Sysmon, httpd), or of a subsystem of the operating system (kernel, Microsoft-Windows-Security-Auditing).
keyword
event.sequence
Sequence number of the event. The sequence number is a value published by some event sources, to make the exact ordering of events unambiguous, regardless of the timestamp precision.
long
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
input.type
keyword
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
source.as.number
Unique number allocated to the autonomous system. The autonomous system number (ASN) uniquely identifies each network on the Internet.
long
source.as.organization.name
Organization name.
keyword
source.as.organization.name.text
Multi-field of source.as.organization.name.
match_only_text
source.geo.city_name
City name.
keyword
source.geo.continent_name
Name of the continent.
keyword
source.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
source.geo.country_name
Country name.
keyword
source.geo.location
Longitude and latitude.
geo_point
source.geo.name
User-defined description of a location, at the level of granularity they care about. Could be the name of their data centers, the floor number, if this describes a local physical entity, city names. Not typically used in automated geolocation.
keyword
source.geo.region_iso_code
Region ISO code.
keyword
source.geo.region_name
Region name.
keyword
source.ip
IP address of the source (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
source.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
source.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
source.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
source.user.name.text
Multi-field of source.user.name.
match_only_text
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
tines.audit_log.created_at
The date and time that the audit log event occurred
date
tines.audit_log.id
A unique ID for the audit log event
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.actionIds
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.diagramNoteIds
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.actionId
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.actionIds
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.agents
flattened
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.allowedHosts
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.authenticationTokenId
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.awsAccessKey
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.awsAssumedRoleArn
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.awsAssumedRoleExternalId
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.awsAuthenticationType
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.awsSecretKey
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.delta.x
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.delta.y
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.description
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.diagramNoteIds
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.diagramNotes
flattened
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.editingSource
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.eventName
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.httpRequestLocationOfToken
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.httpRequestOptions
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.icon
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.id
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.isServiceToken
boolean
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.jwtAlgorithm
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.jwtAutoGenerateTimeClaims
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.jwtHs256Secret
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.jwtPayload
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.jwtPrivateKey
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.links
flattened
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.mode
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.mtlsClientCertificate
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.mtlsClientPrivateKey
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.mtlsRootCertificate
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.name
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthClientId
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthClientSecret
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthGrantType
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthPkceCodeChallengeMethod
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthScope
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthTokenUrl
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.oauthUrl
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.options.createFormEmptyState
boolean
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.readAccess
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.sharedTeamSlugs
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.source
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.standardLibVersion
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.storyId
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.teamId
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.inputs.value
keyword
tines.audit_log.inputs.linkIds
long
tines.audit_log.inputs.storyId
long
tines.audit_log.operation_name
The name of the operation
keyword
tines.audit_log.request_ip
The IP Address the operation was triggered from
keyword
tines.audit_log.request_user_agent
The user agent that the operation was triggered with
keyword
tines.audit_log.tenant_id
The ID of the tenant the operation was triggered on
long
tines.audit_log.updated_at
The date and time that the audit log event was updated
date
tines.audit_log.user_email
The email of the user who triggered the operation
keyword
tines.audit_log.user_id
The ID of the user who triggered the operation
long
tines.audit_log.user_name
The name of the user who triggered the operation
keyword
tines.tenant_url
The tenant URL associated that provided the event
keyword
url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
url.original.text
Multi-field of url.original.
match_only_text
url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
url.registered_domain
The highest registered url domain, stripped of the subdomain. For example, the registered domain for "foo.example.com" is "example.com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last two labels will not work well for TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword
url.top_level_domain
The effective top level domain (eTLD), also known as the domain suffix, is the last part of the domain name. For example, the top level domain for example.com is "com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last label will not work well for effective TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.email
User email address.
keyword
user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text
user_agent.device.name
Name of the device.
keyword
user_agent.name
Name of the user agent.
keyword
user_agent.original
Unparsed user_agent string.
keyword
user_agent.original.text
Multi-field of user_agent.original.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
user_agent.os.full
Operating system name, including the version or code name.
keyword
user_agent.os.full.text
Multi-field of user_agent.os.full.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
user_agent.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
user_agent.os.name.text
Multi-field of user_agent.os.name.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
user_agent.os.type
Use the os.type field to categorize the operating system into one of the broad commercial families. If the OS you're dealing with is not listed as an expected value, the field should not be populated. Please let us know by opening an issue with ECS, to propose its addition.
keyword
user_agent.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
user_agent.version
Version of the user agent.
keyword

An example event for audit looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2023-01-22T11:33:22.000Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "da7a5bbc-6809-4d23-8733-e47afd05ca88",
        "id": "681e4da0-a57a-4818-b61e-2bb4a9557356",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "8.5.1"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "tines.audit_logs",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "681e4da0-a57a-4818-b61e-2bb4a9557356",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "8.5.1"
    },
    "event": {
        "action": "StoryItemsCreation",
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": [
            "configuration"
        ],
        "created": "2023-01-27T15:49:17.946Z",
        "dataset": "tines.audit_logs",
        "id": "3706009",
        "ingested": "2023-01-27T15:49:18Z",
        "original": "{\"created_at\":\"2023-01-22T11:33:22Z\",\"id\":3706009,\"inputs\":{\"inputs\":{\"agents\":[{\"form\":null,\"name\":\"HTTP Request Action\",\"position\":{\"x\":786,\"y\":331},\"timeSavedUnit\":\"minutes\",\"timeSavedValue\":0,\"type\":\"httpRequest\"}],\"diagramNotes\":[],\"links\":[],\"options\":{\"createFormEmptyState\":true},\"storyId\":146411},\"liveEvents\":null},\"operation_name\":\"StoryItemsCreation\",\"request_ip\":\"216.160.83.56\",\"request_user_agent\":\"Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_15_7) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/109.0.0.0 Safari/537.36\",\"tenant_id\":1234,\"updated_at\":\"2023-01-22T11:33:22Z\",\"user_email\":\"example.user@your.domain.tld\",\"user_id\":1234,\"user_name\":\"Example User\"}",
        "type": [
            "info"
        ]
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "related": {
        "ip": [
            "216.160.83.56"
        ],
        "user": [
            "Example User"
        ]
    },
    "source": {
        "as": {
            "number": 209
        },
        "geo": {
            "city_name": "Milton",
            "continent_name": "North America",
            "country_iso_code": "US",
            "country_name": "United States",
            "location": {
                "lat": 47.2513,
                "lon": -122.3149
            },
            "region_iso_code": "US-WA",
            "region_name": "Washington"
        },
        "ip": "216.160.83.56"
    },
    "tags": [
        "preserve_original_event",
        "preserve_duplicate_custom_fields",
        "forwarded"
    ],
    "tines": {
        "audit_log": {
            "created_at": "2023-01-22T11:33:22Z",
            "id": 3706009,
            "inputs": {
                "inputs": {
                    "agents": [
                        {
                            "name": "HTTP Request Action",
                            "position": {
                                "x": 786,
                                "y": 331
                            },
                            "timeSavedUnit": "minutes",
                            "timeSavedValue": 0,
                            "type": "httpRequest"
                        }
                    ],
                    "options": {
                        "createFormEmptyState": true
                    },
                    "storyId": 146411
                }
            },
            "operation_name": "StoryItemsCreation",
            "request_ip": "216.160.83.56",
            "request_user_agent": "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_15_7) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/109.0.0.0 Safari/537.36",
            "tenant_id": 1234,
            "updated_at": "2023-01-22T11:33:22Z",
            "user_email": "example.user@your.domain.tld",
            "user_id": 1234,
            "user_name": "Example User"
        },
        "tenant_url": "http://elastic-package-service-tines_api_mock-1:8080"
    },
    "user": {
        "email": "example.user@your.domain.tld",
        "id": "1234",
        "name": "Example User"
    },
    "user_agent": {
        "device": {
            "name": "Mac"
        },
        "name": "Chrome",
        "original": "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_15_7) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/109.0.0.0 Safari/537.36",
        "os": {
            "full": "Mac OS X 10.15.7",
            "name": "Mac OS X",
            "version": "10.15.7"
        },
        "version": "109.0.0.0"
    }
}

time_saved

All fields ingested to this data stream are stored under tines.time_saved as each time saved report event is stored individually.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Date/time when the event originated. This is the date/time extracted from the event, typically representing when the event was generated by the source. If the event source has no original timestamp, this value is typically populated by the first time the event was received by the pipeline. Required field for all events.
date
data_stream.dataset
The field can contain anything that makes sense to signify the source of the data. Examples include nginx.access, prometheus, endpoint etc. For data streams that otherwise fit, but that do not have dataset set we use the value "generic" for the dataset value. event.dataset should have the same value as data_stream.dataset. Beyond the Elasticsearch data stream naming criteria noted above, the dataset value has additional restrictions: * Must not contain - * No longer than 100 characters
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
A user defined namespace. Namespaces are useful to allow grouping of data. Many users already organize their indices this way, and the data stream naming scheme now provides this best practice as a default. Many users will populate this field with default. If no value is used, it falls back to default. Beyond the Elasticsearch index naming criteria noted above, namespace value has the additional restrictions: * Must not contain - * No longer than 100 characters
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
An overarching type for the data stream. Currently allowed values are "logs" and "metrics". We expect to also add "traces" and "synthetics" in the near future.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.id
Unique ID to describe the event.
keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data is coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.provider
Source of the event. Event transports such as Syslog or the Windows Event Log typically mention the source of an event. It can be the name of the software that generated the event (e.g. Sysmon, httpd), or of a subsystem of the operating system (kernel, Microsoft-Windows-Security-Auditing).
keyword
event.sequence
Sequence number of the event. The sequence number is a value published by some event sources, to make the exact ordering of events unambiguous, regardless of the timestamp precision.
long
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
input.type
keyword
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
source.as.number
Unique number allocated to the autonomous system. The autonomous system number (ASN) uniquely identifies each network on the Internet.
long
source.as.organization.name
Organization name.
keyword
source.as.organization.name.text
Multi-field of source.as.organization.name.
match_only_text
source.geo.city_name
City name.
keyword
source.geo.continent_name
Name of the continent.
keyword
source.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
source.geo.country_name
Country name.
keyword
source.geo.location
Longitude and latitude.
geo_point
source.geo.name
User-defined description of a location, at the level of granularity they care about. Could be the name of their data centers, the floor number, if this describes a local physical entity, city names. Not typically used in automated geolocation.
keyword
source.geo.region_iso_code
Region ISO code.
keyword
source.geo.region_name
Region name.
keyword
source.ip
IP address of the source (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
source.user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
source.user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
source.user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
source.user.name.text
Multi-field of source.user.name.
match_only_text
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
tines.tenant_url
The tenant URL associated that provided the event
keyword
tines.time_saved.date
The date and time for the time saved period
date
tines.time_saved.story_id
Story ID for time saved
long
tines.time_saved.team_id
Team ID for time saved
long
tines.time_saved.value
Time saved in seconds
long
url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
url.original.text
Multi-field of url.original.
match_only_text
url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
url.registered_domain
The highest registered url domain, stripped of the subdomain. For example, the registered domain for "foo.example.com" is "example.com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last two labels will not work well for TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword
url.top_level_domain
The effective top level domain (eTLD), also known as the domain suffix, is the last part of the domain name. For example, the top level domain for example.com is "com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last label will not work well for effective TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.email
User email address.
keyword
user.id
Unique identifier of the user.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text
user_agent.device.name
Name of the device.
keyword
user_agent.name
Name of the user agent.
keyword
user_agent.original
Unparsed user_agent string.
keyword
user_agent.original.text
Multi-field of user_agent.original.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
user_agent.os.full
Operating system name, including the version or code name.
keyword
user_agent.os.full.text
Multi-field of user_agent.os.full.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
user_agent.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
user_agent.os.name.text
Multi-field of user_agent.os.name.
match_only_text
user_agent.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
user_agent.os.type
Use the os.type field to categorize the operating system into one of the broad commercial families. If the OS you're dealing with is not listed as an expected value, the field should not be populated. Please let us know by opening an issue with ECS, to propose its addition.
keyword
user_agent.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
user_agent.version
Version of the user agent.
keyword

An example event for time_saved looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2022-06-01T00:00:00.000Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "da7a5bbc-6809-4d23-8733-e47afd05ca88",
        "id": "681e4da0-a57a-4818-b61e-2bb4a9557356",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "8.5.1"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "tines.time_saved",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "681e4da0-a57a-4818-b61e-2bb4a9557356",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "8.5.1"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "created": "2023-01-27T15:49:53.023Z",
        "dataset": "tines.time_saved",
        "ingested": "2023-01-27T15:49:54Z",
        "original": "{\"date\":\"2022-06-01T00:00:00Z\",\"value\":35910}"
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "tags": [
        "preserve_original_event",
        "preserve_duplicate_custom_fields",
        "forwarded"
    ],
    "tines": {
        "tenant_url": "http://elastic-package-service-tines_api_mock-1:8080",
        "time_saved": {
            "date": "2022-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "value": 35910
        }
    }
}

Changelog

VersionDetailsKibana version(s)

1.9.1

Enhancement View pull request
Changed owners

8.7.1 or higher

1.9.0

Enhancement View pull request
Limit request tracer log count to five.

8.7.1 or higher

1.8.0

Enhancement View pull request
ECS version updated to 8.11.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.7.0

Enhancement View pull request
Improve 'event.original' check to avoid errors if set.

8.7.1 or higher

1.6.0

Enhancement View pull request
Set 'community' owner type.

8.7.1 or higher

1.5.0

Enhancement View pull request
ECS version updated to 8.10.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.4.0

Enhancement View pull request
The format_version in the package manifest changed from 2.11.0 to 3.0.0. Added 'owner.type: elastic' to package manifest.

8.7.1 or higher

1.3.0

Enhancement View pull request
Add tags.yml file so that integration's dashboards and saved searches are tagged with "Security Solution" and displayed in the Security Solution UI.

8.7.1 or higher

1.2.1

Bug fix View pull request
Remove version attribute from ingest node pipelines.

8.7.1 or higher

1.2.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.9.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.1.0

Enhancement View pull request
Document valid duration units.

8.7.1 or higher

1.0.0

Enhancement View pull request
Release Tines as GA.

8.7.1 or higher

0.5.0

Enhancement View pull request
Ensure event.kind is correctly set for pipeline errors.

0.4.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.8.0.

0.3.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package-spec version to 2.7.0.

0.2.0

Enhancement View pull request
Add a new flag to enable request tracing

0.1.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.7.0.

0.0.4

Bug fix View pull request
Make input object arrays flattnened.

0.0.3

Bug fix View pull request
Make email address optional for configuration.

0.0.2

Bug fix View pull request
Fix img link in readme

0.0.1

Enhancement View pull request
Initial draft of the package

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