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AlienVault OTX

Ingest threat intelligence indicators from AlienVault Open Threat Exchange (OTX) with Elastic Agent.

Version
1.22.0 (View all)
Compatible Kibana version(s)
8.10.3 or higher
Subscription level
Basic

This integration is for Alienvault OTX. It retrieves indicators for all pulses subscribed to a specific user account on OTX

Configuration

To use this package, it is required to have an account on Alienvault OTX. Once an account has been created, and at least 1 pulse has been subscribed to, the API key can be retrieved from your user profile dashboard. In the top right corner there should be an OTX KEY.

Logs

Threat

Retrieves all the related indicators over time, related to your pulse subscriptions on OTX.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data is coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
otx.content
Extra text or descriptive content related to the indicator.
keyword
otx.description
A description of the indicator.
keyword
otx.id
The ID of the indicator.
keyword
otx.indicator
The value of the indicator, for example if the type is domain, this would be the value.
keyword
otx.title
Title describing the indicator.
keyword
otx.type
The indicator type, can for example be "domain, email, FileHash-SHA256".
keyword
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.email.address
Identifies a threat indicator as an email address (irrespective of direction).
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.pehash
The file's pehash, if available.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.type
File type (file, dir, or symlink).
keyword
threat.indicator.ip
Identifies a threat indicator as an IP address (irrespective of direction).
ip
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.url.full
If full URLs are important to your use case, they should be stored in url.full, whether this field is reconstructed or present in the event source.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.full.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.full.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.original.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.original.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
threat.indicator.url.query
The query field describes the query string of the request, such as "q=elasticsearch". The ? is excluded from the query string. If a URL contains no ?, there is no query field. If there is a ? but no query, the query field exists with an empty string. The exists query can be used to differentiate between the two cases.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword

An example event for threat looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2023-09-26T06:02:18.318Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "7e240822-d6d7-44de-a74b-02c744232f29",
        "id": "ce0bce5a-6e51-4f74-abca-79147f80e169",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "ti_otx.threat",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "ce0bce5a-6e51-4f74-abca-79147f80e169",
        "snapshot": true,
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": [
            "threat"
        ],
        "created": "2023-09-26T06:02:18.318Z",
        "dataset": "ti_otx.threat",
        "ingested": "2023-09-26T06:02:21Z",
        "kind": "enrichment",
        "original": "{\"count\":40359,\"next\":\"https://otx.alienvault.com/api/v1/indicators/export?types=domain%2CIPv4%2Chostname%2Curl%2CFileHash-SHA256\\u0026modified_since=2020-11-29T01%3A10%3A00+00%3A00\\u0026page=2\",\"previous\":null,\"results\":{\"content\":\"\",\"description\":null,\"id\":1251,\"indicator\":\"info.3000uc.com\",\"title\":null,\"type\":\"hostname\"}}",
        "type": [
            "indicator"
        ]
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "otx": {},
    "tags": [
        "preserve_original_event",
        "forwarded",
        "otx-threat"
    ],
    "threat": {
        "indicator": {
            "type": "domain-name",
            "url": {
                "domain": "info.3000uc.com"
            }
        }
    }
}

Retrieves all indicators from subscribed pulses on OTX from API /api/v1/pulses/subscribed using Filebeat's CEL input. The following subscriptions are included by this API:

  • All pulses by users you are subscribed to
  • All pulses you are directly subscribed to
  • All pulses you have created yourself
  • All pulses from groups you are a member of

Indicators of Comprosie (IoC) Expiration

Pulses Subscribed datastream also supports IoC expiration by using latest transform. Below are the steps on how it is handled:

  1. All the indicators are retrieved into source indices named logs-ti_otx.pulses_subscribed-* using CEL input and processed via ingest pipelines. These indicators have a property named expiration which is either a null value or a timestamp such as "2023-09-07T00:00:00". When the value is null or if the timestamp value is less than current timestamp now(), the indicator is not expired, and hence is still active.
  2. A latest transform is continuosly run on source indices. The purpose of this transform is to:
    • Move only the active indicators from source indices into destination indices named logs-ti_otx_latest.pulses_subscribed-<NUMBER> where NUMBER indicates index version.
    • Delete expired indicators based on the expiration timestamp value.
  3. All the active indicators can be retrieved using destination index alias logs-ti_otx_latest.pulses_subscribed which points to the latest destination index version.
  • Note: Do not use the source indices logs-ti_otx.pulses_subscribed-*, because when the indicators expire, the source indices will contain duplicates. Always use the destination index alias: logs-ti_otx_latest.pulses_subscribed to query all active indicators.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
The cloud project identifier. Examples: Google Cloud Project id, Azure Project id.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data is coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host MAC addresses. The notation format from RFC 7042 is suggested: Each octet (that is, 8-bit byte) is represented by two [uppercase] hexadecimal digits giving the value of the octet as an unsigned integer. Successive octets are separated by a hyphen.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name (FQDN), or a name specified by the user. The recommended value is the lowercase FQDN of the host.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
match_only_text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
labels
Custom key/value pairs. Can be used to add meta information to events. Should not contain nested objects. All values are stored as keyword. Example: docker and k8s labels.
object
labels.is_ioc_transform_source
Field indicating if its the transform source for supporting IOC expiration. This field is dropped from destination indices to facilitate easier filtering of indicators.
constant_keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
otx.content
keyword
otx.count
integer
otx.created
date
otx.description
keyword
otx.expiration
date
otx.id
The ID of the indicator.
long
otx.indicator
keyword
otx.is_active
integer
otx.prefetch_pulse_ids
boolean
otx.pulse.adversary
keyword
otx.pulse.attack_ids
keyword
otx.pulse.author_name
keyword
otx.pulse.created
date
otx.pulse.description
keyword
otx.pulse.extract_source
keyword
otx.pulse.id
keyword
otx.pulse.industries
keyword
otx.pulse.malware_families
keyword
otx.pulse.modified
date
otx.pulse.more_indicators
boolean
otx.pulse.name
keyword
otx.pulse.public
integer
otx.pulse.references
keyword
otx.pulse.revision
integer
otx.pulse.targeted_countries
keyword
otx.pulse.tlp
keyword
otx.role
keyword
otx.t
double
otx.t2
double
otx.t3
double
otx.title
keyword
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.email.address
Identifies a threat indicator as an email address (irrespective of direction).
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.pehash
The file's pehash, if available.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.type
File type (file, dir, or symlink).
keyword
threat.indicator.ip
Identifies a threat indicator as an IP address (irrespective of direction).
ip
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.url.full
If full URLs are important to your use case, they should be stored in url.full, whether this field is reconstructed or present in the event source.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.full.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.full.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.original.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.original.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
threat.indicator.url.query
The query field describes the query string of the request, such as "q=elasticsearch". The ? is excluded from the query string. If a URL contains no ?, there is no query field. If there is a ? but no query, the query field exists with an empty string. The exists query can be used to differentiate between the two cases.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword

An example event for pulses_subscribed looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2023-08-09T05:05:15.000Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "630b4d1a-ff20-4afe-917d-91bd48dfdf03",
        "id": "600a00f7-4847-4076-8fc2-91c18ea2bc86",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "8.10.3"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "ti_otx.pulses_subscribed",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.11.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "600a00f7-4847-4076-8fc2-91c18ea2bc86",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "8.10.3"
    },
    "event": {
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": [
            "threat"
        ],
        "dataset": "ti_otx.pulses_subscribed",
        "ingested": "2023-10-11T15:00:48Z",
        "kind": "enrichment",
        "original": "{\"content\":\"\",\"count\":2,\"created\":\"2023-08-09T05:05:15\",\"description\":\"\",\"expiration\":\"2023-10-10T00:00:00\",\"id\":3450933144,\"indicator\":\"172.67.177.165\",\"is_active\":1,\"prefetch_pulse_ids\":false,\"pulse_raw\":\"{\\\"adversary\\\":\\\"\\\",\\\"attack_ids\\\":[\\\"T1531\\\",\\\"T1059\\\",\\\"T1566\\\"],\\\"author_name\\\":\\\"SampleUser\\\",\\\"created\\\":\\\"2023-08-22T09:43:18.855000\\\",\\\"description\\\":\\\"\\\",\\\"extract_source\\\":[],\\\"id\\\":\\\"64e38336d783f91d6948a7b1\\\",\\\"industries\\\":[],\\\"malware_families\\\":[\\\"WHIRLPOOL\\\"],\\\"modified\\\":\\\"2023-08-22T09:43:18.855000\\\",\\\"more_indicators\\\":false,\\\"name\\\":\\\"Sample Pulse\\\",\\\"public\\\":1,\\\"references\\\":[\\\"https://www.cisa.gov/news-events/analysis-reports/ar23-230a\\\"],\\\"revision\\\":1,\\\"tags\\\":[\\\"cisa\\\",\\\"backdoor\\\",\\\"whirlpool\\\",\\\"malware\\\"],\\\"targeted_countries\\\":[],\\\"tlp\\\":\\\"white\\\"}\",\"role\":\"\",\"t\":0,\"t2\":0.0050694942474365234,\"t3\":2.7960586547851562,\"title\":\"\",\"type\":\"IPv4\"}",
        "type": [
            "indicator"
        ]
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "cel"
    },
    "otx": {
        "count": 2,
        "created": "2023-08-09T05:05:15.000Z",
        "expiration": "2023-10-10T00:00:00.000Z",
        "id": 3450933144,
        "is_active": 1,
        "prefetch_pulse_ids": false,
        "pulse": {
            "attack_ids": [
                "T1531",
                "T1059",
                "T1566"
            ],
            "author_name": "SampleUser",
            "created": "2023-08-22T09:43:18.855Z",
            "description": "",
            "extract_source": [],
            "id": "64e38336d783f91d6948a7b1",
            "industries": [],
            "malware_families": [
                "WHIRLPOOL"
            ],
            "modified": "2023-08-22T09:43:18.855Z",
            "more_indicators": false,
            "name": "Sample Pulse",
            "public": 1,
            "references": [
                "https://www.cisa.gov/news-events/analysis-reports/ar23-230a"
            ],
            "revision": 1,
            "targeted_countries": [],
            "tlp": "white"
        },
        "role": "",
        "t": 0,
        "t2": 0.0050694942474365234,
        "t3": 2.7960586547851562
    },
    "tags": [
        "preserve_original_event",
        "forwarded",
        "otx-pulses_subscribed",
        "cisa",
        "backdoor",
        "whirlpool",
        "malware"
    ],
    "threat": {
        "indicator": {
            "ip": "172.67.177.165",
            "provider": "OTX",
            "type": "ipv4-addr"
        }
    }
}

Changelog

VersionDetailsKibana version(s)

1.22.0

Enhancement View pull request
Limit request tracer log count to five.

8.10.3 or higher

1.21.0

Enhancement View pull request
ECS version updated to 8.11.0.

8.10.3 or higher

1.20.0

Enhancement View pull request
Improve 'event.original' check to avoid errors if set.

8.10.3 or higher

1.19.0

Enhancement View pull request
Add Pulses Subscribed datastream to support IoC expiration

Enhancement View pull request
Add DLM policy. Add owner.type to package manifest.

8.10.3 or higher

1.18.0

Enhancement View pull request
ECS version updated to 8.10.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.17.0

Enhancement View pull request
The format_version in the package manifest changed from 2.11.0 to 3.0.0. Removed dotted YAML keys from package manifest. Added 'owner.type: elastic' to package manifest.

8.7.1 or higher

1.16.0

Enhancement View pull request
Add tags.yml file so that integration's dashboards and saved searches are tagged with "Security Solution" and displayed in the Security Solution UI.

8.7.1 or higher

1.15.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package-spec to 2.10.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.14.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.9.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.13.0

Enhancement View pull request
Document duration units.

8.7.1 or higher

1.12.0

Enhancement View pull request
Document valid duration units.

8.7.1 or higher

1.11.0

Enhancement View pull request
Ensure event.kind is correctly set for pipeline errors.

8.7.1 or higher

1.10.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.8.0.

8.7.1 or higher

1.9.0

Enhancement View pull request
Add a new flag to enable request tracing

8.7.1 or higher

1.8.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.7.0.

8.0.0 or higher

1.7.1

Enhancement View pull request
Honor preserve_original_event setting.

8.0.0 or higher

1.7.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.6.0.

8.0.0 or higher

1.6.1

Enhancement View pull request
Add support to drop empty documents

8.0.0 or higher

1.6.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.5.0.

8.0.0 or higher

1.5.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.4.0

8.0.0 or higher

1.4.2

Bug fix View pull request
Fix proxy URL documentation rendering.

8.0.0 or higher

1.4.1

Enhancement View pull request
Update categories to include threat_intel.

8.0.0 or higher

1.4.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.3.0.

8.0.0 or higher

1.3.2

Enhancement View pull request
Update readme file to add documentation link

8.0.0 or higher

1.3.1

Enhancement View pull request
Update package descriptions

8.0.0 or higher

1.3.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.2

8.0.0 or higher

1.2.2

Enhancement View pull request
Add field mapping for event.created

8.0.0 or higher

1.2.1

Enhancement View pull request
Add documentation for multi-fields

8.0.0 or higher

1.2.0

Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.0

8.0.0 or higher

1.1.0

Enhancement View pull request
Adding threat.feed fields and dashboards

8.0.0 or higher

1.0.3

Bug fix View pull request
Change test public IPs to the supported subset

8.0.0 or higher

1.0.2

Enhancement View pull request
Bump minimum version

8.0.0 or higher

1.0.1

Enhancement View pull request
Update title and description.

1.0.0

Enhancement View pull request
Initial release

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