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Mandiant Advantage

Collect Threat Intelligence from products within the Mandiant Advantage platform.

Version
1.1.0 (View all)
Compatible Kibana version(s)
8.12.0 or higher
Supported Serverless project types

Security
Observability
Subscription level
Basic
Level of support
Partner

Overview

The Mandiant Advantage integration allows users to retrieve IOCs (Indicators of Compromise) from the Threat Intelligence Advantage Module.

These indicators can be used for correlation in Elastic Security to help discover potential threats. Mandiant Threat Intelligence gives security practitioners unparalleled visibility and expertise into threats that matter to their business right now.

Our threat intelligence is compiled by over 500 threat intelligence analysts across 30 countries, researching actors via undercover adversarial pursuits, incident forensics, malicious infrastructure reconstructions and actor identification processes that comprise the deep knowledge embedded in the Mandiant Intel Grid.

Data streams

The Mandiant Advantage integration collects one type of data stream: threat_intelligence

Threat Intelligence

IOCs are retrieved via the Mandiant Threat Intelligence API.

Compatibility

  • This integration has been tested against the Threat Intelligence API v4.

Requirements

You need Elasticsearch for storing and searching your data and Kibana for visualizing and managing it. You can use our hosted Elasticsearch Service on Elastic Cloud, which is recommended, or self-manage the Elastic Stack on your own hardware.

Setup

For step-by-step instructions on how to set up an integration, see the Getting started guide.

For instructions on how to get Threat Intelligence API v4 credentials, see the Mandiant Documentation Portal.

Filtering IOCs

The integration allows you to filter the amount of IOCs that are ingested, by using the following configuration parameters:

  • Initial interval
    • The time in the past to start the collection of Indicator data from, based on an indicators last_update date.
    • Supported units for this parameter are h/m/s. The default value is 720h (i.e 30 days)
    • You may reduce this interval if you do not want as much historical data to be ingested when the integration first runs.
  • Minimum IC-Score
    • Indicators that have an IC-Score greater than or equal to the given value will be collected.
    • Indicators with any IC-Score will be collected if a value is set to 0.
    • You might set this to a different value such as 80, to ensure that only high confidence indicators are ingested.

Logs reference

Threat Intelligence

Retrieves IOCs using the Mandiant Threat Intelligence API over time.

An example event for threat_intelligence looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2023-05-05T15:45:59.710Z",
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.7.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "category": [
            "threat"
        ],
        "kind": "enrichment",
        "module": "ti_mandiant_advantage_threat_intelligence",
        "risk_score": 50.0,
        "type": [
            "indicator"
        ]
    },
    "mandiant": {
        "threat_intelligence": {
            "ioc": {
                "categories": [
                    "exploit/vuln-scanning",
                    "exploit",
                    "spam/sender",
                    "spam"
                ],
                "first_seen": "2022-06-18T23:22:01.000Z",
                "id": "ipv4--af6febd0-3351-5b32-a66c-bbac306c7360",
                "last_seen": "2023-03-23T23:22:01.000Z",
                "last_update_date": "2023-05-05T15:45:59.710Z",
                "mscore": 50,
                "sources": [
                    {
                        "first_seen": "2022-09-22T23:40:00.911+0000",
                        "last_seen": "2022-09-23T00:33:09.000+0000",
                        "osint": true,
                        "source_name": "voipbl"
                    },
                    {
                        "category": [
                            "exploit/vuln-scanning",
                            "exploit"
                        ],
                        "first_seen": "2022-09-14T09:20:00.904+0000",
                        "last_seen": "2023-02-24T18:20:00.857+0000",
                        "osint": true,
                        "source_name": "greensnow"
                    },
                    {
                        "category": [
                            "spam/sender",
                            "spam"
                        ],
                        "first_seen": "2022-06-18T23:22:01.386+0000",
                        "last_seen": "2023-03-23T23:22:01.308+0000",
                        "osint": true,
                        "source_name": "sblam_blacklist"
                    },
                    {
                        "first_seen": "2022-09-14T23:34:04.312+0000",
                        "last_seen": "2022-09-23T00:33:09.000+0000",
                        "osint": true,
                        "source_name": "blocklist_net_ua"
                    }
                ],
                "type": "ipv4",
                "value": "1.128.3.4"
            }
        }
    },
    "related": {
        "ip": [
            "1.128.3.4"
        ]
    },
    "threat": {
        "feed": {
            "name": "Mandiant Threat Intelligence"
        },
        "indicator": {
            "as": {
                "number": 1221,
                "organization": {
                    "name": "Telstra Pty Ltd"
                }
            },
            "confidence": "Medium",
            "first_seen": "2022-06-18T23:22:01.000Z",
            "ip": "1.128.3.4",
            "last_seen": "2023-03-23T23:22:01.000Z",
            "marking": {
                "tlp": "GREEN",
                "tlp_version": "2.0"
            },
            "modified_at": "2023-05-05T15:45:59.710Z",
            "provider": [
                "voipbl",
                "greensnow",
                "sblam_blacklist",
                "blocklist_net_ua"
            ],
            "type": "ipv4-addr"
        }
    }
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cloud
Fields related to the cloud or infrastructure the events are coming from.
group
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.account.name
The cloud account name or alias used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account name, Google Cloud ORG display name.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data is coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Name of the module this data is coming from. If your monitoring agent supports the concept of modules or plugins to process events of a given source (e.g. Apache logs), event.module should contain the name of this module.
keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.risk_score
Risk score or priority of the event (e.g. security solutions). Use your system's original value here.
float
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host MAC addresses. The notation format from RFC 7042 is suggested: Each octet (that is, 8-bit byte) is represented by two [uppercase] hexadecimal digits giving the value of the octet as an unsigned integer. Successive octets are separated by a hyphen.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name (FQDN), or a name specified by the user. The recommended value is the lowercase FQDN of the host.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
match_only_text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Input type
keyword
log.offset
Log offset
long
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.associated_hashes
List of associated hashes and their types.
object
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.attributed_associations
List of attributed associations that this indicator has to other Malware families or Actors.
object
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.categories
Categories associated with this indicator.
keyword
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.first_seen
IOC first seen date.
date
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.id
IOC internal ID.
keyword
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.is_exclusive
Whether the indicator is exclusive to Mandiant or not.
boolean
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.last_seen
IOC last seen date.
date
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.last_update_date
IOC last update date.
date
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.mscore
M-Score (IC-Score) between 0 - 100.
integer
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.sources
List of the indicator sources.
object
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.type
IOC type.
keyword
mandiant.threat_intelligence.ioc.value
IOC value.
keyword
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.name
The name of the threat feed in UI friendly format.
keyword
threat.group.id
The id of the group for a set of related intrusion activity that are tracked by a common name in the security community. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® group id.
keyword
threat.group.name
The name of the group for a set of related intrusion activity that are tracked by a common name in the security community. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® group name.
keyword
threat.indicator.as.number
Unique number allocated to the autonomous system. The autonomous system number (ASN) uniquely identifies each network on the Internet.
long
threat.indicator.as.organization.name
Organization name.
keyword
threat.indicator.as.organization.name.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.as.organization.name.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.confidence
Identifies the vendor-neutral confidence rating using the None/Low/Medium/High scale defined in Appendix A of the STIX 2.1 framework. Vendor-specific confidence scales may be added as custom fields.
keyword
threat.indicator.description
Describes the type of action conducted by the threat.
keyword
threat.indicator.email.address
Identifies a threat indicator as an email address (irrespective of direction).
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha384
SHA384 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha512
SHA512 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.first_seen
The date and time when intelligence source first reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.geo.city_name
City name.
keyword
threat.indicator.geo.continent_name
Name of the continent.
keyword
threat.indicator.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
threat.indicator.geo.country_name
Country name.
keyword
threat.indicator.geo.location
Longitude and latitude.
geo_point
threat.indicator.geo.region_iso_code
Region ISO code.
keyword
threat.indicator.geo.region_name
Region name.
keyword
threat.indicator.ip
Identifies a threat indicator as an IP address (irrespective of direction).
ip
threat.indicator.last_seen
The date and time when intelligence source last reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.marking.tlp
Traffic Light Protocol sharing markings.
keyword
threat.indicator.marking.tlp_version
Traffic Light Protocol version.
keyword
threat.indicator.modified_at
The date and time when intelligence source last modified information for this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.url.fragment
Portion of the url after the #, such as "top". The # is not part of the fragment.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.full
If full URLs are important to your use case, they should be stored in url.full, whether this field is reconstructed or present in the event source.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.full.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.full.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.original.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.original.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.password
Password of the request.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
threat.indicator.url.query
The query field describes the query string of the request, such as "q=elasticsearch". The ? is excluded from the query string. If a URL contains no ?, there is no query field. If there is a ? but no query, the query field exists with an empty string. The exists query can be used to differentiate between the two cases.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.registered_domain
The highest registered url domain, stripped of the subdomain. For example, the registered domain for "foo.example.com" is "example.com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last two labels will not work well for TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
threat.indicator.url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.subdomain
The subdomain portion of a fully qualified domain name includes all of the names except the host name under the registered_domain. In a partially qualified domain, or if the the qualification level of the full name cannot be determined, subdomain contains all of the names below the registered domain. For example the subdomain portion of "www.east.mydomain.co.uk" is "east". If the domain has multiple levels of subdomain, such as "sub2.sub1.example.com", the subdomain field should contain "sub2.sub1", with no trailing period.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.top_level_domain
The effective top level domain (eTLD), also known as the domain suffix, is the last part of the domain name. For example, the top level domain for example.com is "com". This value can be determined precisely with a list like the public suffix list (http://publicsuffix.org). Trying to approximate this by simply taking the last label will not work well for effective TLDs such as "co.uk".
keyword
threat.indicator.url.username
Username of the request.
keyword
threat.software.name
The name of the software used by this threat to conduct behavior commonly modeled using MITRE ATT&CK®. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® software name.
keyword
threat.software.type
The type of software used by this threat to conduct behavior commonly modeled using MITRE ATT&CK®. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® software type.
keyword

Changelog

VersionDetailsKibana version(s)

1.1.0

Enhancement View pull request
Set sensitive values as secret.

8.12.0 or higher

1.0.1

Enhancement View pull request
Changed owners

8.6.2 or higher

1.0.0

Enhancement View pull request
Release package as GA.

8.6.2 or higher

0.1.0

Enhancement View pull request
Initial release of Mandiant Advantage Elastic Integration.

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