What is an Elastic integration?

This integration is powered by Elastic Agent. Elastic Agent is a single, unified way to add monitoring for logs, metrics, and other types of data to a host. It can also protect hosts from security threats, query data from operating systems, forward data from remote services or hardware, and more. Refer to our documentation for a detailed comparison between Beats and Elastic Agent.

Prefer to use Beats for this use case? See Filebeat modules for logs or Metricbeat modules for metrics.

This integration is for AbuseCH logs. It includes the following datasets for retrieving logs from the AbuseCH API:

  • url dataset: Supports URL based indicators from AbuseCH API.
  • malware dataset: Supports Malware based indicators from AbuseCH API.
  • malwarebazaar dataset: Supports indicators from the MalwareBazaar from AbuseCH.

Logs

URL

The AbuseCH URL data_stream retrieves threat intelligence indicators from the URL API endpoint https://urlhaus-api.abuse.ch/v1/urls/recent/.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
abusech.url.blacklists.spamhaus_dbl
If the indicator is listed on the spamhaus blacklist.
keyword
abusech.url.blacklists.surbl
If the indicator is listed on the surbl blacklist.
keyword
abusech.url.id
The ID of the indicator.
keyword
abusech.url.larted
Indicates whether the malware URL has been reported to the hosting provider (true or false)
boolean
abusech.url.reporter
The Twitter handle of the reporter that has reported this malware URL (or anonymous).
keyword
abusech.url.tags
A list of tags associated with the queried malware URL
keyword
abusech.url.threat
The threat corresponding to this malware URL.
keyword
abusech.url.url_status
The current status of the URL. Possible values are: online, offline and unknown.
keyword
abusech.url.urlhaus_reference
Link to URLhaus entry.
keyword
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.first_seen
The date and time when intelligence source first reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.ip
Identifies a threat indicator as an IP address (irrespective of direction).
ip
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.reference
Reference URL linking to additional information about this indicator.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.url.full
If full URLs are important to your use case, they should be stored in url.full, whether this field is reconstructed or present in the event source.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.full.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.full.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.original.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.original.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
threat.indicator.url.query
The query field describes the query string of the request, such as "q=elasticsearch". The ? is excluded from the query string. If a URL contains no ?, there is no query field. If there is a ? but no query, the query field exists with an empty string. The exists query can be used to differentiate between the two cases.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword

The AbuseCH malware data_stream retrieves threat intelligence indicators from the payload API endpoint https://urlhaus-api.abuse.ch/v1/payloads/recent/.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
abusech.malware.signature
Malware familiy.
keyword
abusech.malware.virustotal.link
Link to the Virustotal report.
keyword
abusech.malware.virustotal.percent
AV detection in percent.
float
abusech.malware.virustotal.result
AV detection ration.
keyword
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.ssdeep
SSDEEP hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.tlsh
The file's import tlsh, if available.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.size
File size in bytes. Only relevant when file.type is "file".
long
threat.indicator.file.type
File type (file, dir, or symlink).
keyword
threat.indicator.first_seen
The date and time when intelligence source first reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword

The AbuseCH malwarebazaar data_stream retrieves threat intelligence indicators from the MalwareBazaar API endpoint https://mb-api.abuse.ch/api/v1/.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
abusech.malwarebazaar.anonymous
Identifies if the sample was submitted anonymously.
long
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.algorithm
Algorithm used to generate the public key.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.cscb_listed
Whether the certificate is present on the Code Signing Certificate Blocklist (CSCB)
boolean
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.cscb_reason
Why the certificate is present on the Code Signing Certificate Blocklist (CSCB)
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.issuer_cn
Common name (CN) of issuing certificate authority.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.serial_number
Unique serial number issued by the certificate authority.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.subject_cn
Common name (CN) of subject.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.thumbprint
Hash of certificate
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.thumbprint_algorithm
Algorithm used to create thumbprint
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.valid_from
Time at which the certificate is first considered valid.
date
abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign.valid_to
Time at which the certificate is no longer considered valid.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.dhash_icon
In case the file is a PE executable: dhash of the samples icon
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.intelligence.downloads
Number of downloads from MalwareBazaar.
long
abusech.malwarebazaar.intelligence.mail.Generic
Malware seen in generic spam traffic.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.intelligence.mail.IT
Malware seen in IT spam traffic.
keyword
abusech.malwarebazaar.intelligence.uploads
Number of uploads from MalwareBazaar.
long
abusech.malwarebazaar.tags
A list of tags associated with the queried malware sample.
keyword
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.file.elf.telfhash
telfhash symbol hash for ELF file.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.extension
File extension, excluding the leading dot. Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha384
The file's sha384 hash, if available.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.ssdeep
SSDEEP hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.tlsh
The file's import tlsh, if available.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.mime_type
MIME type should identify the format of the file or stream of bytes using https://www.iana.org/assignments/media-types/media-types.xhtml[IANA official types], where possible. When more than one type is applicable, the most specific type should be used.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.size
File size in bytes. Only relevant when file.type is "file".
long
threat.indicator.file.type
File type (file, dir, or symlink).
keyword
threat.indicator.file.x509.issuer.common_name
List of common name (CN) of issuing certificate authority.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.x509.not_after
Time at which the certificate is no longer considered valid.
date
threat.indicator.file.x509.not_before
Time at which the certificate is first considered valid.
date
threat.indicator.file.x509.public_key_algorithm
Algorithm used to generate the public key.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.x509.serial_number
Unique serial number issued by the certificate authority. For consistency, if this value is alphanumeric, it should be formatted without colons and uppercase characters.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.x509.subject.common_name
List of common names (CN) of subject.
keyword
threat.indicator.first_seen
The date and time when intelligence source first reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
threat.indicator.last_seen
The date and time when intelligence source last reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.software.alias
The alias(es) of the software for a set of related intrusion activity that are tracked by a common name in the security community. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® associated software description.
keyword

The AbuseCH threatfox data_stream retrieves threat intelligence indicators from the Threat Fox API endpoint https://threatfox-api.abuse.ch/api/v1/.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
abusech.threatfox.confidence_level
Confidence level between 0-100
long
abusech.threatfox.malware
The malware associated with the IOC
keyword
abusech.threatfox.tags
A list of tags associated with the queried malware sample.
keyword
abusech.threatfox.threat_type
The type of threat
keyword
abusech.threatfox.threat_type_desc
The threat descsription
keyword
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset name.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.type
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the third level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.type represents a categorization "sub-bucket" that, when used along with the event.category field values, enables filtering events down to a level appropriate for single visualization. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple event types.
keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
log.file.path
Path to the log file.
keyword
log.flags
Flags for the log file.
keyword
log.offset
Offset of the entry in the log file.
long
message
For log events the message field contains the log message, optimized for viewing in a log viewer. For structured logs without an original message field, other fields can be concatenated to form a human-readable summary of the event. If multiple messages exist, they can be combined into one message.
match_only_text
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.feed.dashboard_id
Dashboard ID used for Kibana CTI UI
constant_keyword
threat.feed.name
Display friendly feed name
constant_keyword
threat.indicator.confidence
Identifies the vendor-neutral confidence rating using the None/Low/Medium/High scale defined in Appendix A of the STIX 2.1 framework. Vendor-specific confidence scales may be added as custom fields.
keyword
threat.indicator.description
Describes the type of action conducted by the threat.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.elf.telfhash
telfhash symbol hash for ELF file.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.extension
File extension, excluding the leading dot. Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.sha384
SHA384 hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.ssdeep
SSDEEP hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.hash.tlsh
TLSH hash.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.mime_type
MIME type should identify the format of the file or stream of bytes using https://www.iana.org/assignments/media-types/media-types.xhtml[IANA official types], where possible. When more than one type is applicable, the most specific type should be used.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.pe.imphash
A hash of the imports in a PE file. An imphash -- or import hash -- can be used to fingerprint binaries even after recompilation or other code-level transformations have occurred, which would change more traditional hash values. Learn more at https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2014/01/tracking-malware-import-hashing.html.
keyword
threat.indicator.file.size
File size in bytes. Only relevant when file.type is "file".
long
threat.indicator.file.type
File type (file, dir, or symlink).
keyword
threat.indicator.first_seen
The date and time when intelligence source first reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.ip
Identifies a threat indicator as an IP address (irrespective of direction).
ip
threat.indicator.last_seen
The date and time when intelligence source last reported sighting this indicator.
date
threat.indicator.port
Identifies a threat indicator as a port number (irrespective of direction).
long
threat.indicator.provider
The name of the indicator's provider.
keyword
threat.indicator.reference
Reference URL linking to additional information about this indicator.
keyword
threat.indicator.type
Type of indicator as represented by Cyber Observable in STIX 2.0.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
threat.indicator.url.extension
The field contains the file extension from the original request url, excluding the leading dot. The file extension is only set if it exists, as not every url has a file extension. The leading period must not be included. For example, the value must be "png", not ".png". Note that when the file name has multiple extensions (example.tar.gz), only the last one should be captured ("gz", not "tar.gz").
keyword
threat.indicator.url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.original.text
Multi-field of threat.indicator.url.original.
match_only_text
threat.indicator.url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
threat.indicator.url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
threat.indicator.url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword
threat.software.alias
The alias(es) of the software for a set of related intrusion activity that are tracked by a common name in the security community. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® associated software description.
keyword
threat.software.name
The name of the software used by this threat to conduct behavior commonly modeled using MITRE ATT&CK®. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® software name.
keyword
threat.software.reference
The reference URL of the software used by this threat to conduct behavior commonly modeled using MITRE ATT&CK®. While not required, you can use a MITRE ATT&CK® software reference URL.
keyword

Changelog

VersionDetails
1.8.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.5.0.
1.7.1
Bug fix View pull request
Change abusech.malwarebazaar.code_sign to Nested field
1.7.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add Threat Fox datastream
1.6.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.4.0
1.5.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix proxy URL documentation rendering.
1.5.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update categories to include threat_intel.
1.4.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.3.0.
1.3.2
Enhancement View pull request
Added link to AbuseCH documentation in readme
1.3.1
Enhancement View pull request
Update package descriptions
1.3.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.2
1.2.3
Enhancement View pull request
Add mapping for event.created
1.2.2
Enhancement View pull request
Add documentation for multi-fields
1.2.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix field mapping conflicts in threat.indicator.file.x509.not_before/not_after
1.2.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.0
1.1.5
Bug fix View pull request
Removes extra tag from dashboards
1.1.4
Bug fix View pull request
Regenerate test files using the new GeoIP database
1.1.3
Bug fix View pull request
Change test public IPs to the supported subset
1.1.2
Enhancement View pull request
Fixing typo in base-fields.yml
1.1.1
Enhancement View pull request
Update ECS fields for threat.feed.name
1.1.0
Enhancement View pull request
Adding dashboards and adding minor tweaks to pipeline
1.0.4
Enhancement View pull request
Bump minimum version in manifest
1.0.3
Enhancement View pull request
Bump minimum version
1.0.2
Enhancement View pull request
Update title and description.
1.0.1
Enhancement View pull request
Fix invisible package icon
1.0.0
Enhancement View pull request
Initial Release