What is an Elastic integration?

This integration is powered by Elastic Agent. Elastic Agent is a single, unified way to add monitoring for logs, metrics, and other types of data to a host. It can also protect hosts from security threats, query data from operating systems, forward data from remote services or hardware, and more. Refer to our documentation for a detailed comparison between Beats and Elastic Agent.

Prefer to use Beats for this use case? See Filebeat modules for logs or Metricbeat modules for metrics.

Overview

This integration is for Cisco Secure Endpoint logs. It includes the following datasets for receiving logs over syslog or read from a file:

  • event dataset: supports Cisco Secure Endpoint Event logs.

Logs

Secure Endpoint

The event dataset collects Cisco Secure Endpoint logs.

An example event for event looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2021-01-13T10:13:08.000Z",
    "agent": {
        "ephemeral_id": "1bee52ec-b713-415e-9d9b-32c5217f9796",
        "id": "83d8d392-d20c-40ef-a257-bf9cf314d1db",
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "type": "filebeat",
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "cisco": {
        "secure_endpoint": {
            "cloud_ioc": {
                "description": "Microsoft Word launched PowerShell. This is indicative of multiple dropper variants that make use of Visual Basic Application macros to perform nefarious activities, such as downloading and executing malicious executables.",
                "short_description": "W32.WinWord.Powershell"
            },
            "computer": {
                "active": true,
                "connector_guid": "test_connector_guid",
                "external_ip": "8.8.8.8",
                "network_addresses": [
                    {
                        "ip": "10.10.10.10",
                        "mac": "38:1e:eb:ba:2c:15"
                    }
                ]
            },
            "connector_guid": "test_connector_guid",
            "event_type_id": 1107296274,
            "file": {
                "disposition": "Clean",
                "identity": {},
                "parent": {
                    "disposition": "Clean",
                    "identity": {}
                }
            },
            "group_guids": [
                "test_group_guid"
            ],
            "related": {
                "mac": [
                    "38-1E-EB-BA-2C-15"
                ]
            }
        }
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "dataset": "cisco_secure_endpoint.event",
        "namespace": "ep",
        "type": "logs"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.3.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "83d8d392-d20c-40ef-a257-bf9cf314d1db",
        "snapshot": false,
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "action": "Cloud IOC",
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "category": [
            "file"
        ],
        "code": "1107296274",
        "created": "2022-04-13T11:54:03.909Z",
        "dataset": "cisco_secure_endpoint.event",
        "id": "1515298355162029000",
        "ingested": "2022-04-13T11:54:04Z",
        "kind": "alert",
        "original": "{\"data\":{\"cloud_ioc\":{\"description\":\"Microsoft Word launched PowerShell. This is indicative of multiple dropper variants that make use of Visual Basic Application macros to perform nefarious activities, such as downloading and executing malicious executables.\",\"short_description\":\"W32.WinWord.Powershell\"},\"computer\":{\"active\":true,\"connector_guid\":\"test_connector_guid\",\"external_ip\":\"8.8.8.8\",\"hostname\":\"Demo_AMP\",\"links\":{\"computer\":\"https://api.eu.amp.cisco.com/v1/computers/test_computer\",\"group\":\"https://api.eu.amp.cisco.com/v1/groups/test_group\",\"trajectory\":\"https://api.eu.amp.cisco.com/v1/computers/test_computer/trajectory\"},\"network_addresses\":[{\"ip\":\"10.10.10.10\",\"mac\":\"38:1e:eb:ba:2c:15\"}]},\"connector_guid\":\"test_connector_guid\",\"date\":\"2021-01-13T10:13:08+00:00\",\"event_type\":\"Cloud IOC\",\"event_type_id\":1107296274,\"file\":{\"disposition\":\"Clean\",\"file_name\":\"PowerShell.exe\",\"file_path\":\"/C:/Windows/SysWOW64/WindowsPowerShell/v1.0/PowerShell.exe\",\"identity\":{\"sha256\":\"6c05e11399b7e3c8ed31bae72014cf249c144a8f4a2c54a758eb2e6fad47aec7\"},\"parent\":{\"disposition\":\"Clean\",\"identity\":{\"sha256\":\"3d46e95284f93bbb76b3b7e1bf0e1b2d51e8a9411c2b6e649112f22f92de63c2\"}}},\"group_guids\":[\"test_group_guid\"],\"id\":1515298355162029000,\"severity\":\"Medium\",\"start_date\":\"2021-01-13T10:13:08+00:00\",\"start_timestamp\":1610532788,\"timestamp\":1610532788,\"timestamp_nanoseconds\":162019000},\"metadata\":{\"links\":{\"next\":\"http://7d3a7ffa9a19:8080/v1/events?start_date=2022-04-12T11:54:03+00:00\\u0026limit=1\\u0026offset=1\",\"self\":\"http://7d3a7ffa9a19:8080/v1/events?start_date=2022-04-12T11:54:03+00:00\\u0026limit=1\"},\"results\":{\"current_item_count\":1,\"index\":0,\"items_per_page\":1,\"total\":2}},\"version\":\"v1.2.0\"}",
        "severity": 2,
        "start": "2021-01-13T10:13:08.000Z"
    },
    "file": {
        "hash": {
            "sha256": "6c05e11399b7e3c8ed31bae72014cf249c144a8f4a2c54a758eb2e6fad47aec7"
        },
        "name": "PowerShell.exe",
        "path": "/C:/Windows/SysWOW64/WindowsPowerShell/v1.0/PowerShell.exe"
    },
    "host": {
        "hostname": "Demo_AMP",
        "name": "Demo_AMP"
    },
    "input": {
        "type": "httpjson"
    },
    "process": {
        "hash": {
            "sha256": "3d46e95284f93bbb76b3b7e1bf0e1b2d51e8a9411c2b6e649112f22f92de63c2"
        }
    },
    "related": {
        "hash": [
            "6c05e11399b7e3c8ed31bae72014cf249c144a8f4a2c54a758eb2e6fad47aec7"
        ],
        "hosts": [
            "Demo_AMP"
        ],
        "ip": [
            "8.8.8.8",
            "10.10.10.10"
        ]
    },
    "tags": [
        "cisco-secure_endpoint",
        "forwarded",
        "preserve_original_event"
    ]
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
cisco.secure_endpoint.bp_data
Endpoint isolation information
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.cloud_ioc.description
Description of the related IOC for specific IOC events from AMP.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.cloud_ioc.short_description
Short description of the related IOC for specific IOC events from AMP.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.command_line.arguments
The CLI arguments related to the Cloud Threat IOC reported by Cisco.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.computer.active
If the current endpoint is active or not.
boolean
cisco.secure_endpoint.computer.connector_guid
The GUID of the connector, similar to top level connector_guid, but unique if multiple connectors are involved.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.computer.external_ip
The external IP of the related host.
ip
cisco.secure_endpoint.computer.network_addresses
All network interface information on the related host.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.connector_guid
The GUID of the connector sending information to AMP.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.detection
The name of the malware detected.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.detection_id
The ID of the detection.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.error.description
Description of an endpoint error event.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.error.error_code
The error code describing the related error event.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.event_type_id
A sub ID of the event, depending on event type.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.archived_file.disposition
Categorization of a file archive related to a file, for example "Malicious" or "Clean".
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.archived_file.identity.md5
MD5 hash of the archived file related to the malicious event.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.archived_file.identity.sha1
SHA1 hash of the archived file related to the malicious event.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.archived_file.identity.sha256
SHA256 hash of the archived file related to the malicious event.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.attack_details.application
The application name related to Exploit Prevention events.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.attack_details.attacked_module
Path to the executable or dll that was attacked and detected by Exploit Prevention.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.attack_details.base_address
The base memory address related to the exploit detected.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.attack_details.indicators
Different indicator types that matches the exploit detected, for example different MITRE tactics.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.attack_details.suspicious_files
An array of related files when an attack is detected by Exploit Prevention.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.disposition
Categorization of file, for example "Malicious" or "Clean".
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.file.parent.disposition
Categorization of parrent, for example "Malicious" or "Clean".
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.group_guids
An array of group GUIDS related to the connector sending information to AMP.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.disposition
Categorization of a network event related to a file, for example "Malicious" or "Clean".
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.nfm.direction
The current direction based on source and destination IP.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.parent.disposition
Categorization of a IOC for example "Malicious" or "Clean".
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.parent.identify.sha256
SHA256 hash of the related IOC.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.parent.identity.md5
MD5 hash of the related IOC.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.network_info.parent.identity.sha1
SHA1 hash of the related IOC.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.related.cve
An array of all related CVEs
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.related.mac
An array of all related MAC addresses.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.clean
Boolean value if a scanned file was clean or not.
boolean
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.description
Description of an event related to a scan being initiated, for example the specific directory name.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.malicious_detections
Count of malicious files or documents detected related to a single scan event.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.scanned_files
Count of files scanned in a directory.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.scanned_paths
Count of different directories scanned related to a single scan event.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.scan.scanned_processes
Count of processes scanned related to a single scan event.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.tactics
List of all MITRE tactics related to the incident found.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.techniques
List of all MITRE techniques related to the incident found.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_end_time
When the threat hunt finalized or closed.
date
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_hunt_guid
The GUID of the related investigation tracking issue.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_id
The id of the related incident for the threat hunting activity.
long
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_remediation
Recommendations to resolve the vulnerability or exploited host.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_report_guid
The GUID of the related threat hunting report.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_start_time
When the threat hunt was initiated.
date
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_summary
Summary of the outcome on the threat hunting activity.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.incident_title
Title of the incident related to the threat hunting activity.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.severity
Severity result of the threat hunt registered to the malicious event. Can be Low-Critical.
keyword
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.tactics
List of all MITRE tactics related to the incident found.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.threat_hunting.techniques
List of all MITRE techniques related to the incident found.
flattened
cisco.secure_endpoint.timestamp_nanoseconds
The timestamp in Epoch nanoseconds.
date
cisco.secure_endpoint.vulnerabilities
An array of related vulnerabilities to the malicious event.
flattened
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host is running.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
Name of the project in Google Cloud.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host is running.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
destination.address
Some event destination addresses are defined ambiguously. The event will sometimes list an IP, a domain or a unix socket. You should always store the raw address in the .address field. Then it should be duplicated to .ip or .domain, depending on which one it is.
keyword
destination.as.number
Unique number allocated to the autonomous system. The autonomous system number (ASN) uniquely identifies each network on the Internet.
long
destination.as.organization.name
Organization name.
keyword
destination.as.organization.name.text
Multi-field of destination.as.organization.name.
match_only_text
destination.domain
The domain name of the destination system. This value may be a host name, a fully qualified domain name, or another host naming format. The value may derive from the original event or be added from enrichment.
keyword
destination.geo.city_name
City name.
keyword
destination.geo.continent_name
Name of the continent.
keyword
destination.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
destination.geo.country_name
Country name.
keyword
destination.geo.location
Longitude and latitude.
geo_point
destination.ip
IP address of the destination (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
destination.port
Port of the destination.
long
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.action
The action captured by the event. This describes the information in the event. It is more specific than event.category. Examples are group-add, process-started, file-created. The value is normally defined by the implementer.
keyword
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.code
Identification code for this event, if one exists. Some event sources use event codes to identify messages unambiguously, regardless of message language or wording adjustments over time. An example of this is the Windows Event ID.
keyword
event.created
event.created contains the date/time when the event was first read by an agent, or by your pipeline. This field is distinct from @timestamp in that @timestamp typically contain the time extracted from the original event. In most situations, these two timestamps will be slightly different. The difference can be used to calculate the delay between your source generating an event, and the time when your agent first processed it. This can be used to monitor your agent's or pipeline's ability to keep up with your event source. In case the two timestamps are identical, @timestamp should be used.
date
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.id
Unique ID to describe the event.
keyword
event.ingested
Timestamp when an event arrived in the central data store. This is different from @timestamp, which is when the event originally occurred. It's also different from event.created, which is meant to capture the first time an agent saw the event. In normal conditions, assuming no tampering, the timestamps should chronologically look like this: @timestamp < event.created < event.ingested.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.original
Raw text message of entire event. Used to demonstrate log integrity or where the full log message (before splitting it up in multiple parts) may be required, e.g. for reindex. This field is not indexed and doc_values are disabled. It cannot be searched, but it can be retrieved from _source. If users wish to override this and index this field, please see Field data types in the Elasticsearch Reference.
keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.severity
The numeric severity of the event according to your event source. What the different severity values mean can be different between sources and use cases. It's up to the implementer to make sure severities are consistent across events from the same source. The Syslog severity belongs in log.syslog.severity.code. event.severity is meant to represent the severity according to the event source (e.g. firewall, IDS). If the event source does not publish its own severity, you may optionally copy the log.syslog.severity.code to event.severity.
long
event.start
event.start contains the date when the event started or when the activity was first observed.
date
event.timezone
This field should be populated when the event's timestamp does not include timezone information already (e.g. default Syslog timestamps). It's optional otherwise. Acceptable timezone formats are: a canonical ID (e.g. "Europe/Amsterdam"), abbreviated (e.g. "EST") or an HH:mm differential (e.g. "-05:00").
keyword
file.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
file.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
file.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
file.name
Name of the file including the extension, without the directory.
keyword
file.path
Full path to the file, including the file name. It should include the drive letter, when appropriate.
keyword
file.path.text
Multi-field of file.path.
match_only_text
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host mac addresses.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
input.type
Type of Filebeat input.
keyword
network.direction
Direction of the network traffic. When mapping events from a host-based monitoring context, populate this field from the host's point of view, using the values "ingress" or "egress". When mapping events from a network or perimeter-based monitoring context, populate this field from the point of view of the network perimeter, using the values "inbound", "outbound", "internal" or "external". Note that "internal" is not crossing perimeter boundaries, and is meant to describe communication between two hosts within the perimeter. Note also that "external" is meant to describe traffic between two hosts that are external to the perimeter. This could for example be useful for ISPs or VPN service providers.
keyword
network.transport
Same as network.iana_number, but instead using the Keyword name of the transport layer (udp, tcp, ipv6-icmp, etc.) The field value must be normalized to lowercase for querying.
keyword
process.args
Array of process arguments, starting with the absolute path to the executable. May be filtered to protect sensitive information.
keyword
process.args_count
Length of the process.args array. This field can be useful for querying or performing bucket analysis on how many arguments were provided to start a process. More arguments may be an indication of suspicious activity.
long
process.command_line
Full command line that started the process, including the absolute path to the executable, and all arguments. Some arguments may be filtered to protect sensitive information.
wildcard
process.command_line.text
Multi-field of process.command_line.
match_only_text
process.executable
Absolute path to the process executable.
keyword
process.executable.text
Multi-field of process.executable.
match_only_text
process.hash.md5
MD5 hash.
keyword
process.hash.sha1
SHA1 hash.
keyword
process.hash.sha256
SHA256 hash.
keyword
process.name
Process name. Sometimes called program name or similar.
keyword
process.name.text
Multi-field of process.name.
match_only_text
process.pid
Process id.
long
related.hash
All the hashes seen on your event. Populating this field, then using it to search for hashes can help in situations where you're unsure what the hash algorithm is (and therefore which key name to search).
keyword
related.hosts
All hostnames or other host identifiers seen on your event. Example identifiers include FQDNs, domain names, workstation names, or aliases.
keyword
related.ip
All of the IPs seen on your event.
ip
related.user
All the user names or other user identifiers seen on the event.
keyword
source.ip
IP address of the source (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
source.port
Port of the source.
long
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
threat.tactic.id
The id of tactic used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® tactic, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/tactics/TA0002/ )
keyword
threat.tactic.name
Name of the type of tactic used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® tactic, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/tactics/TA0002/)
keyword
threat.tactic.reference
The reference url of tactic used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® tactic, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/tactics/TA0002/ )
keyword
threat.technique.id
The id of technique used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® technique, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/techniques/T1059/)
keyword
threat.technique.name
The name of technique used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® technique, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/techniques/T1059/)
keyword
threat.technique.name.text
Multi-field of threat.technique.name.
match_only_text
threat.technique.reference
The reference url of technique used by this threat. You can use a MITRE ATT&CK® technique, for example. (ex. https://attack.mitre.org/techniques/T1059/)
keyword
user.domain
Name of the directory the user is a member of. For example, an LDAP or Active Directory domain name.
keyword
user.email
User email address.
keyword
user.name
Short name or login of the user.
keyword
user.name.text
Multi-field of user.name.
match_only_text

Changelog

VersionDetails
2.6.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.4.0
2.5.2
Enhancement View pull request
Update package name and description to align with standard wording
2.5.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix rate limit reset time.
2.5.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update package to ECS 8.3.0.
2.4.1
Enhancement View pull request
update read me with link to vendor documentation
2.4.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.2
2.3.1
Bug fix View pull request
Fix typo in config template for ignoring host enrichment
2.3.0
Enhancement View pull request
Ensure pagination exits correctly and remove possible host fields
2.2.0
Enhancement View pull request
Fix propagation of information from host.name.
2.1.1
Enhancement View pull request
Add documentation for multi-fields
2.1.0
Enhancement View pull request
Adding possibility to extract host and user data if possible.
2.0.0
Enhancement View pull request
Update to ECS 8.0

Breaking change View pull request
Normalize MAC address; replace host.user.name with user.name
1.0.0
Enhancement View pull request
GA integration
0.2.2
Bug fix View pull request
Regenerate test files using the new GeoIP database
0.2.1
Bug fix View pull request
Change test public IPs to the supported subset
0.2.0
Enhancement View pull request
Add 8.0.0 version constraint
0.1.1
Enhancement View pull request
Update Title and Description.
0.1.0
Enhancement View pull request
Initial migration from Filebeat Module