What is an Elastic integration?

This integration is powered by Elastic Agent. Elastic Agent is a single, unified way to add monitoring for logs, metrics, and other types of data to a host. It can also protect hosts from security threats, query data from operating systems, forward data from remote services or hardware, and more. Refer to our documentation for a detailed comparison between Beats and Elastic Agent.

Prefer to use Beats for this use case? See Filebeat modules for logs or Metricbeat modules for metrics.

The Amazon ELB integration allows you to monitor Amazon Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)—a tool that distributes application traffic to multiple targets.

Use the Amazon ELB integration to collect logs and metrics with detailed information about requests sent to the load balancer. Then visualize that data in Kibana, create alerts to notify you if something goes wrong, and reference those logs and metrics when troubleshooting an issue.

For example, you could use this data to analyze traffic patterns, view healthy and unhealthy hosts, and track connection and backend errors.

Data streams

The Amazon ELB integration collects two types of data: logs and metrics.

Logs help you keep a record of events happening in Amazon ELB. Logs collected by the Amazon ELB integration include the time a request was received, the client's IP address, latencies, request paths, server responses, and more. See more details in the Logs reference.

Metrics give you insight into the state of Amazon ELB. Metrics collected by the Amazon ELB integration include the host name, IP address, average latency, and more. See more details in the Metrics reference.

Requirements

You need Elasticsearch for storing and searching your data and Kibana for visualizing and managing it. You can use our hosted Elasticsearch Service on Elastic Cloud, which is recommended, or self-manage the Elastic Stack on your own hardware.

Before using any AWS integration you will need:

  • AWS Credentials to connect with your AWS account.
  • AWS Permissions to make sure the user you're using to connect has permission to share the relevant data.

For more details about these requirements, see the AWS integration documentation.

Setup

Use this integration if you only need to collect data from the Amazon ELB service.

If you want to collect data from two or more AWS services, consider using the AWS integration. When you configure the AWS integration, you can collect data from as many AWS services as you'd like.

For step-by-step instructions on how to set up an integration, see the Getting started guide.

To send classic ELB access logs to an S3 bucket, see enable access logs for classic load balancer.

For an application load balancer, see enable access log for application load balancer.

For a network load balancer, see enable access log for network load balancer.

Logs reference

The elb dataset collects logs from AWS ELBs.

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
aws.elb.action_executed
The action executed when processing the request (forward, fixed-response, authenticate...). It can contain several values.
keyword
aws.elb.backend.http.response.status_code
The status code from the backend (status code sent to the client from ELB is stored in http.response.status_code
long
aws.elb.backend.ip
The IP address of the backend processing this connection.
keyword
aws.elb.backend.port
The port in the backend processing this connection.
keyword
aws.elb.backend_processing_time.sec
The total time in seconds since the connection is sent to the backend till the backend starts responding.
float
aws.elb.chosen_cert.arn
The ARN of the chosen certificate presented to the client in TLS/SSL connections.
keyword
aws.elb.chosen_cert.serial
The serial number of the chosen certificate presented to the client in TLS/SSL connections.
keyword
aws.elb.classification
The classification for desync mitigation.
keyword
aws.elb.classification_reason
The classification reason code.
keyword
aws.elb.connection_time.ms
The total time of the connection in milliseconds, since it is opened till it is closed.
long
aws.elb.error.reason
The error reason if the executed action failed.
keyword
aws.elb.incoming_tls_alert
The integer value of TLS alerts received by the load balancer from the client, if present.
keyword
aws.elb.listener
The ELB listener that received the connection.
keyword
aws.elb.matched_rule_priority
The priority value of the rule that matched the request, if a rule matched.
keyword
aws.elb.name
The name of the load balancer.
keyword
aws.elb.protocol
The protocol of the load balancer (http or tcp).
keyword
aws.elb.redirect_url
The URL used if a redirection action was executed.
keyword
aws.elb.request_processing_time.sec
The total time in seconds since the connection or request is received until it is sent to a registered backend.
float
aws.elb.response_processing_time.sec
The total time in seconds since the response is received from the backend till it is sent to the client.
float
aws.elb.ssl_cipher
The SSL cipher used in TLS/SSL connections.
keyword
aws.elb.ssl_protocol
The SSL protocol used in TLS/SSL connections.
keyword
aws.elb.target_group.arn
The ARN of the target group handling the request.
keyword
aws.elb.target_port
List of IP addresses and ports for the targets that processed this request.
keyword
aws.elb.target_status_code
List of status codes from the responses of the targets.
keyword
aws.elb.tls_handshake_time.ms
The total time for the TLS handshake to complete in milliseconds once the connection has been established.
long
aws.elb.tls_named_group
The TLS named group.
keyword
aws.elb.trace_id
The contents of the X-Amzn-Trace-Id header.
keyword
aws.elb.type
The type of the load balancer for v2 Load Balancers.
keyword
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
The cloud project identifier. Examples: Google Cloud Project id, Azure Project id.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
destination.bytes
Bytes sent from the destination to the source.
long
destination.domain
The domain name of the destination system. This value may be a host name, a fully qualified domain name, or another host naming format. The value may derive from the original event or be added from enrichment.
keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.category
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the second level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.category represents the "big buckets" of ECS categories. For example, filtering on event.category:process yields all events relating to process activity. This field is closely related to event.type, which is used as a subcategory. This field is an array. This will allow proper categorization of some events that fall in multiple categories.
keyword
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.end
event.end contains the date when the event ended or when the activity was last observed.
date
event.kind
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the highest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.kind gives high-level information about what type of information the event contains, without being specific to the contents of the event. For example, values of this field distinguish alert events from metric events. The value of this field can be used to inform how these kinds of events should be handled. They may warrant different retention, different access control, it may also help understand whether the data coming in at a regular interval or not.
keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
event.outcome
This is one of four ECS Categorization Fields, and indicates the lowest level in the ECS category hierarchy. event.outcome simply denotes whether the event represents a success or a failure from the perspective of the entity that produced the event. Note that when a single transaction is described in multiple events, each event may populate different values of event.outcome, according to their perspective. Also note that in the case of a compound event (a single event that contains multiple logical events), this field should be populated with the value that best captures the overall success or failure from the perspective of the event producer. Further note that not all events will have an associated outcome. For example, this field is generally not populated for metric events, events with event.type:info, or any events for which an outcome does not make logical sense.
keyword
event.start
event.start contains the date when the event started or when the activity was first observed.
date
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host MAC addresses. The notation format from RFC 7042 is suggested: Each octet (that is, 8-bit byte) is represented by two [uppercase] hexadecimal digits giving the value of the octet as an unsigned integer. Successive octets are separated by a hyphen.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
match_only_text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
http.request.body.bytes
Size in bytes of the request body.
long
http.request.method
HTTP request method. The value should retain its casing from the original event. For example, GET, get, and GeT are all considered valid values for this field.
keyword
http.request.referrer
Referrer for this HTTP request.
keyword
http.response.body.bytes
Size in bytes of the response body.
long
http.response.status_code
HTTP response status code.
long
http.version
HTTP version.
keyword
source.address
Some event source addresses are defined ambiguously. The event will sometimes list an IP, a domain or a unix socket. You should always store the raw address in the .address field. Then it should be duplicated to .ip or .domain, depending on which one it is.
keyword
source.as.number
Unique number allocated to the autonomous system. The autonomous system number (ASN) uniquely identifies each network on the Internet.
long
source.as.organization.name
Organization name.
keyword
source.as.organization.name.text
Multi-field of source.as.organization.name.
match_only_text
source.geo.city_name
City name.
keyword
source.geo.continent_name
Name of the continent.
keyword
source.geo.country_iso_code
Country ISO code.
keyword
source.geo.country_name
Country name.
keyword
source.geo.location
Longitude and latitude.
geo_point
source.geo.region_name
Region name.
keyword
source.ip
IP address of the source (IPv4 or IPv6).
ip
source.port
Port of the source.
long
tags
List of keywords used to tag each event.
keyword
trace.id
Unique identifier of the trace. A trace groups multiple events like transactions that belong together. For example, a user request handled by multiple inter-connected services.
keyword
url.domain
Domain of the url, such as "www.elastic.co". In some cases a URL may refer to an IP and/or port directly, without a domain name. In this case, the IP address would go to the domain field. If the URL contains a literal IPv6 address enclosed by [ and ] (IETF RFC 2732), the [ and ] characters should also be captured in the domain field.
keyword
url.original
Unmodified original url as seen in the event source. Note that in network monitoring, the observed URL may be a full URL, whereas in access logs, the URL is often just represented as a path. This field is meant to represent the URL as it was observed, complete or not.
wildcard
url.original.text
Multi-field of url.original.
match_only_text
url.path
Path of the request, such as "/search".
wildcard
url.port
Port of the request, such as 443.
long
url.query
The query field describes the query string of the request, such as "q=elasticsearch". The ? is excluded from the query string. If a URL contains no ?, there is no query field. If there is a ? but no query, the query field exists with an empty string. The exists query can be used to differentiate between the two cases.
keyword
url.scheme
Scheme of the request, such as "https". Note: The : is not part of the scheme.
keyword
user_agent.device.name
Name of the device.
keyword
user_agent.name
Name of the user agent.
keyword
user_agent.original
Unparsed user_agent string.
keyword
user_agent.original.text
Multi-field of user_agent.original.
match_only_text
user_agent.version
Version of the user agent.
keyword

An example event for elb looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2018-07-02T22:23:00.186Z",
    "aws": {
        "elb": {
            "action_executed": [
                "forward",
                "redirect"
            ],
            "backend": {
                "http": {
                    "response": {
                        "status_code": 200
                    }
                },
                "ip": "10.0.0.1",
                "port": "80"
            },
            "backend_processing_time": {
                "sec": 0.001
            },
            "matched_rule_priority": "0",
            "name": "app/my-loadbalancer/50dc6c495c0c9188",
            "protocol": "http",
            "request_processing_time": {
                "sec": 0
            },
            "response_processing_time": {
                "sec": 0
            },
            "target_group": {
                "arn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-2:123456789012:targetgroup/my-targets/73e2d6bc24d8a067"
            },
            "target_port": [
                "10.0.0.1:80"
            ],
            "target_status_code": [
                "200"
            ],
            "trace_id": "Root=1-58337262-36d228ad5d99923122bbe354",
            "type": "http"
        }
    },
    "cloud": {
        "provider": "aws"
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "event": {
        "category": "web",
        "end": "2018-07-02T22:23:00.186Z",
        "kind": "event",
        "original": "http 2018-07-02T22:23:00.186641Z app/my-loadbalancer/50dc6c495c0c9188 192.168.131.39:2817 10.0.0.1:80 0.000 0.001 0.000 200 200 34 366 \"GET http://www.example.com:80/ HTTP/1.1\" \"curl/7.46.0\" - - arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-2:123456789012:targetgroup/my-targets/73e2d6bc24d8a067 \"Root=1-58337262-36d228ad5d99923122bbe354\" \"-\" \"-\" 0 2018-07-02T22:22:48.364000Z \"forward,redirect\" \"-\" \"-\" \"10.0.0.1:80\" \"200\" \"-\" \"-\"",
        "outcome": "success",
        "start": "2018-07-02T22:22:48.364000Z"
    },
    "http": {
        "request": {
            "body": {
                "bytes": 34
            },
            "method": "GET"
        },
        "response": {
            "body": {
                "bytes": 366
            },
            "status_code": 200
        },
        "version": "1.1"
    },
    "source": {
        "address": "192.168.131.39",
        "ip": "192.168.131.39",
        "port": 2817
    },
    "tags": [
        "preserve_original_event"
    ],
    "trace": {
        "id": "Root=1-58337262-36d228ad5d99923122bbe354"
    },
    "url": {
        "domain": "www.example.com",
        "original": "http://www.example.com:80/",
        "path": "/",
        "port": 80,
        "scheme": "http"
    },
    "user_agent": {
        "device": {
            "name": "Other"
        },
        "name": "curl",
        "original": "curl/7.46.0",
        "version": "7.46.0"
    }
}

Metrics reference

An example event for elb looks as following:

{
    "@timestamp": "2022-06-08T18:19:00.000Z",
    "agent": {
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "id": "90bfb41e-b925-420f-973e-9c1115297278",
        "type": "metricbeat",
        "ephemeral_id": "8c94e850-82e2-42ae-bd41-44ce7bbbb50c",
        "version": "8.2.0"
    },
    "elastic_agent": {
        "id": "90bfb41e-b925-420f-973e-9c1115297278",
        "version": "8.2.0",
        "snapshot": false
    },
    "cloud": {
        "provider": "aws",
        "region": "eu-central-1",
        "account": {
            "name": "elastic-beats",
            "id": "123456789"
        }
    },
    "ecs": {
        "version": "8.0.0"
    },
    "data_stream": {
        "namespace": "default",
        "type": "metrics",
        "dataset": "aws.elb_metrics"
    },
    "service": {
        "type": "aws"
    },
    "host": {
        "hostname": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "os": {
            "kernel": "5.10.47-linuxkit",
            "codename": "focal",
            "name": "Ubuntu",
            "family": "debian",
            "type": "linux",
            "version": "20.04.4 LTS (Focal Fossa)",
            "platform": "ubuntu"
        },
        "containerized": true,
        "ip": [
            "192.168.96.7"
        ],
        "name": "docker-fleet-agent",
        "mac": [
            "02:42:c0:a8:60:07"
        ],
        "architecture": "x86_64"
    },
    "metricset": {
        "period": 60000,
        "name": "cloudwatch"
    },
    "aws": {
        "elb": {
            "metrics": {
                "HealthyHostCount": {
                    "max": 2
                },
                "UnHealthyHostCount": {
                    "max": 0
                },
                "HTTPCode_Backend_4XX": {
                    "sum": 2
                },
                "HTTPCode_Backend_2XX": {
                    "sum": 31
                },
                "RequestCount": {
                    "sum": 33
                },
                "Latency": {
                    "avg": 0.0010771534659645772
                }
            }
        },
        "cloudwatch": {
            "namespace": "AWS/ELB"
        }
    },
    "event": {
        "duration": 15866718200,
        "agent_id_status": "verified",
        "ingested": "2022-06-08T18:20:24Z",
        "module": "aws",
        "dataset": "aws.elb_metrics"
    }
}

Exported fields

FieldDescriptionType
@timestamp
Event timestamp.
date
aws.applicationelb.metrics.ActiveConnectionCount.sum
The total number of concurrent TCP connections active from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.ClientTLSNegotiationErrorCount.sum
The number of TLS connections initiated by the client that did not establish a session with the load balancer due to a TLS error.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.ConsumedLCUs.avg
The number of load balancer capacity units (LCU) used by your load balancer.
double
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_3XX_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 3XX redirection codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_4XX_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 4XX client error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_500_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 500 error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_502_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 502 error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_503_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 503 error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_504_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 504 error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_5XX_Count.sum
The number of HTTP 5XX server error codes that originate from the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTP_Fixed_Response_Count.sum
The number of fixed-response actions that were successful.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTP_Redirect_Count.sum
The number of redirect actions that were successful.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.HTTP_Redirect_Url_Limit_Exceeded_Count.sum
The number of redirect actions that couldn't be completed because the URL in the response location header is larger than 8K.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.IPv6ProcessedBytes.sum
The total number of bytes processed by the load balancer over IPv6.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.IPv6RequestCount.sum
The number of IPv6 requests received by the load balancer.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.NewConnectionCount.sum
The total number of new TCP connections established from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.ProcessedBytes.sum
The total number of bytes processed by the load balancer over IPv4 and IPv6.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.RejectedConnectionCount.sum
The number of connections that were rejected because the load balancer had reached its maximum number of connections.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.RequestCount.sum
The number of requests processed over IPv4 and IPv6.
long
aws.applicationelb.metrics.RuleEvaluations.sum
The number of rules processed by the load balancer given a request rate averaged over an hour.
long
aws.cloudwatch.namespace
The namespace specified when query cloudwatch api.
keyword
aws.dimensions.*
Metric dimensions.
object
aws.dimensions.AvailabilityZone
Filters the metric data by the specified Availability Zone.
keyword
aws.dimensions.LoadBalancer
Filters the metric data by load balancer.
keyword
aws.dimensions.LoadBalancerName
Filters the metric data by the specified load balancer.
keyword
aws.dimensions.TargetGroup
Filters the metric data by target group.
keyword
aws.elb.metrics.BackendConnectionErrors.sum
The number of connections that were not successfully established between the load balancer and the registered instances.
long
aws.elb.metrics.EstimatedALBActiveConnectionCount.avg
The estimated number of concurrent TCP connections active from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.
double
aws.elb.metrics.EstimatedALBConsumedLCUs.avg
The estimated number of load balancer capacity units (LCU) used by an Application Load Balancer.
double
aws.elb.metrics.EstimatedALBNewConnectionCount.avg
The estimated number of new TCP connections established from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.
double
aws.elb.metrics.EstimatedProcessedBytes.avg
The estimated number of bytes processed by an Application Load Balancer.
double
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_Backend_2XX.sum
The number of HTTP 2XX response code generated by registered instances.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_Backend_3XX.sum
The number of HTTP 3XX response code generated by registered instances.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_Backend_4XX.sum
The number of HTTP 4XX response code generated by registered instances.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_Backend_5XX.sum
The number of HTTP 5XX response code generated by registered instances.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_4XX.sum
The number of HTTP 4XX client error codes generated by the load balancer.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HTTPCode_ELB_5XX.sum
The number of HTTP 5XX server error codes generated by the load balancer.
long
aws.elb.metrics.HealthyHostCount.max
The number of healthy instances registered with your load balancer.
long
aws.elb.metrics.Latency.avg
The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer sent the request to a registered instance until the instance started to send the response headers.
double
aws.elb.metrics.RequestCount.sum
The number of requests completed or connections made during the specified interval.
long
aws.elb.metrics.SpilloverCount.sum
The total number of requests that were rejected because the surge queue is full.
long
aws.elb.metrics.SurgeQueueLength.max
The total number of requests (HTTP listener) or connections (TCP listener) that are pending routing to a healthy instance.
long
aws.elb.metrics.UnHealthyHostCount.max
The number of unhealthy instances registered with your load balancer.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.ActiveFlowCount.avg
The total number of concurrent flows (or connections) from clients to targets.
double
aws.networkelb.metrics.ActiveFlowCount_TCP.avg
The total number of concurrent TCP flows (or connections) from clients to targets.
double
aws.networkelb.metrics.ActiveFlowCount_TLS.avg
The total number of concurrent TLS flows (or connections) from clients to targets.
double
aws.networkelb.metrics.ActiveFlowCount_UDP.avg
The total number of concurrent UDP flows (or connections) from clients to targets.
double
aws.networkelb.metrics.ClientTLSNegotiationErrorCount.sum
The total number of TLS handshakes that failed during negotiation between a client and a TLS listener.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.ConsumedLCUs.avg
The number of load balancer capacity units (LCU) used by your load balancer.
double
aws.networkelb.metrics.HealthyHostCount.max
The number of targets that are considered healthy.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.NewFlowCount.sum
The total number of new flows (or connections) established from clients to targets in the time period.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.NewFlowCount_TLS.sum
The total number of new TLS flows (or connections) established from clients to targets in the time period.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.ProcessedBytes.sum
The total number of bytes processed by the load balancer, including TCP/IP headers.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.ProcessedBytes_TLS.sum
The total number of bytes processed by TLS listeners.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.TCP_Client_Reset_Count.sum
The total number of reset (RST) packets sent from a client to a target.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.TCP_ELB_Reset_Count.sum
The total number of reset (RST) packets generated by the load balancer.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.TCP_Target_Reset_Count.sum
The total number of reset (RST) packets sent from a target to a client.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.TargetTLSNegotiationErrorCount.sum
The total number of TLS handshakes that failed during negotiation between a TLS listener and a target.
long
aws.networkelb.metrics.UnHealthyHostCount.max
The number of targets that are considered unhealthy.
long
aws.s3.bucket.name
Name of a S3 bucket.
keyword
aws.tags.*
Tag key value pairs from aws resources.
object
cloud
Fields related to the cloud or infrastructure the events are coming from.
group
cloud.account.id
The cloud account or organization id used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account id, Google Cloud ORG Id, or other unique identifier.
keyword
cloud.account.name
The cloud account name or alias used to identify different entities in a multi-tenant environment. Examples: AWS account name, Google Cloud ORG display name.
keyword
cloud.availability_zone
Availability zone in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
cloud.image.id
Image ID for the cloud instance.
keyword
cloud.instance.id
Instance ID of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.instance.name
Instance name of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.machine.type
Machine type of the host machine.
keyword
cloud.project.id
The cloud project identifier. Examples: Google Cloud Project id, Azure Project id.
keyword
cloud.provider
Name of the cloud provider. Example values are aws, azure, gcp, or digitalocean.
keyword
cloud.region
Region in which this host, resource, or service is located.
keyword
container.id
Unique container id.
keyword
container.image.name
Name of the image the container was built on.
keyword
container.labels
Image labels.
object
container.name
Container name.
keyword
data_stream.dataset
Data stream dataset.
constant_keyword
data_stream.namespace
Data stream namespace.
constant_keyword
data_stream.type
Data stream type.
constant_keyword
ecs.version
ECS version this event conforms to. ecs.version is a required field and must exist in all events. When querying across multiple indices -- which may conform to slightly different ECS versions -- this field lets integrations adjust to the schema version of the events.
keyword
error
These fields can represent errors of any kind. Use them for errors that happen while fetching events or in cases where the event itself contains an error.
group
error.message
Error message.
match_only_text
event.dataset
Event dataset
constant_keyword
event.module
Event module
constant_keyword
host.architecture
Operating system architecture.
keyword
host.containerized
If the host is a container.
boolean
host.domain
Name of the domain of which the host is a member. For example, on Windows this could be the host's Active Directory domain or NetBIOS domain name. For Linux this could be the domain of the host's LDAP provider.
keyword
host.hostname
Hostname of the host. It normally contains what the hostname command returns on the host machine.
keyword
host.id
Unique host id. As hostname is not always unique, use values that are meaningful in your environment. Example: The current usage of beat.name.
keyword
host.ip
Host ip addresses.
ip
host.mac
Host MAC addresses. The notation format from RFC 7042 is suggested: Each octet (that is, 8-bit byte) is represented by two [uppercase] hexadecimal digits giving the value of the octet as an unsigned integer. Successive octets are separated by a hyphen.
keyword
host.name
Name of the host. It can contain what hostname returns on Unix systems, the fully qualified domain name, or a name specified by the user. The sender decides which value to use.
keyword
host.os.build
OS build information.
keyword
host.os.codename
OS codename, if any.
keyword
host.os.family
OS family (such as redhat, debian, freebsd, windows).
keyword
host.os.kernel
Operating system kernel version as a raw string.
keyword
host.os.name
Operating system name, without the version.
keyword
host.os.name.text
Multi-field of host.os.name.
match_only_text
host.os.platform
Operating system platform (such centos, ubuntu, windows).
keyword
host.os.version
Operating system version as a raw string.
keyword
host.type
Type of host. For Cloud providers this can be the machine type like t2.medium. If vm, this could be the container, for example, or other information meaningful in your environment.
keyword
service.type
The type of the service data is collected from. The type can be used to group and correlate logs and metrics from one service type. Example: If logs or metrics are collected from Elasticsearch, service.type would be elasticsearch.
keyword